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Center for Oral History: Hear from the voices of Hawaiʻi's past

pineapple cannery labor 1928 national archives
Department of Labor - Women's Bureau
/
U.S. National Archives and Records Administration
Young women work in a pineapple cannery in Hawaiʻi on Nov. 20, 1928.

As part of an ongoing project with the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Center for Oral History, we bring you voices from Hawaiʻi’s past centered around a theme each month.

Since the start of this collaboration in September, we've heard from labor organizers during Hawaiʻi's plantation days, activists involved with the Protect Kaho‘olawe ‘Ohana, and political leaders of the Democratic and Republican parties.

Read and listen to those stories below and stay tuned for more.

Labor movement during Hawaiʻi's plantation days

Reviving Kahoʻolawe after decades of military bombing

The legacy of Hawaiʻi's political parties

  • John A Burns with JFK
    Robert Knudsen. White House Photographs. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston
    /
    Public Domain
    With less than a week until Election Day, we're looking back at Hawaiʻi’s political past when organizers and workers were the backbones of campaigns. As part of our ongoing project with the UH Mānoa Center for Oral History, we hear insights from two men who worked behind the scenes to support the late Gov. John A. Burns.
  • hawaii_state_capitol.jpg
    Casey Harlow / HPR
    /
    It’s been a little more than a week since Election Day, and while the national picture remains a bit unsettled, Hawaiʻi's political outlook is pretty clear. It’s dominated by Democrats — that’s been the story since shortly before statehood. As part of our ongoing project with the UH Mānoa Center for Oral History, we hear insights from two politicians about the legacy of progressives in Hawaiʻi.
  • Dwight Eisenhower, William Quinn
    AP
    /
    AP
    When it comes to political parties, Hawaiʻi has been dominated by the Democrats since the elections of 1954. As part of an ongoing project with the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Center for Oral History, we hear from some Republican leaders who played a role in the state's political discussions and debates.

This collaboration is supported by the SHARP Initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities through the American Council of Learned Societies.

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