korea

Byeok Song
Byeok Song

Graphic artist Byeok Song created propaganda for the North Korean regime in the 1990’s.  During the economic depression there, hunger led to prison time for him, and to his escape through China to South Korea.  Song now works under an alias to protect his family, using art to bring attention to his homeland.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Last week, long forgotten trophies of a 19th century skirmish between the United States and Korea were discovered at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis. USNI News reported that workers uncovered battle flags captured by U.S. Marines in 1871. In today’s Pacific News Minute, Neal Conan explains why both sides saw it as a victory.

U.S. Missile Defense Agency
U.S. Missile Defense Agency

Yesterday, the Navy said it successfully shot down a medium range missile at the Pacific Missile Range Facility off Kauai. The interceptor was an SM 6 missile fired from the destroyer USS John Paul Jones, and while officials said the test has been planned for some time, it came just a few days after North Korea’s latest launch, which flew over the northern part of Japan and crashed into the Pacific. In response, Japan plans to upgrade its anti-missile systems.

Republic of Korea / Flickr
Republic of Korea / Flickr

Political scandal is still dominating the news in South Korea. The president’s powers have been suspended and her future remains uncertain. The parliament is in transition and to the surprise of some, financial markets remain relatively calm. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

South Korea started the week with the Prime Minister as acting president.  The ruling political party is split between those who remain loyal to President Park Geun Hye, and those who joined in voting for her impeachment last week on allegations of influence peddling.

ITU Pictures / Flickr
ITU Pictures / Flickr

South Korea’s president has put her political life in the hands of that country’s parliament. She says she’s willing to resign, but there’s a catch—and it’s left many observers confused about the future. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

It seems like South Korean President Park Geun Hye is offering to resign…to step down before her five-year term expires in February 2018.  She told a national television audience Tuesday that she would let South Korea’s parliament “decide my fate, including a plan to shorten my presidential term.” 

Philippe Teuwen / Flickr

Much of the news from South Korea these days focuses on politics—and the scandal surrounding the country’s president. But tourism has quietly become another big story in Korea—and now that too is being affected by politics. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Dodger Nation / Youtube
Dodger Nation / Youtube

There’s a growing scandal in South Korea, and this one has nothing to do with the president. While Park Geun-Hye  remains at the center of a government controversy, the latest news involves baseball. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Rene Adamos / Flickr
Rene Adamos / Flickr

The State Department of Labor and Industrial Relations expects overall employment in Hawai‘i will grow by nearly 6% over the next 8 years. The biggest gains are expected in construction, education and health services.  In South Korea, the employment picture tells a different story—especially for young college graduates. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay Commons

Exports are an important part of any economy—and that’s especially true for many countries in the Asia Pacific.  From semiconductors to cars, South Korea depends on exports for nearly a third of its overall economic activity.  And while trends are declining for many products, there’s one notable exception.  HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

It’s been a week since South Korea’s biggest shipping company filed for bankruptcy. The shipper’s parent company is investing more money, but the future remains uncertain. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

There’s no doubt Hanjin Shipping remains in dangerous waters.  When the company suddenly filed for bankruptcy last week, the action shook ports around the world.  The company’s assets were frozen—stranding ships—many of which have been unable to unload or take on cargo.

Republic of Korea / Flickr
Republic of Korea / Flickr

Several science organizations now agree that last month was the hottest July on record for planet earth.  Calculations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration agree with those from NASA and Japan’s weather office.  And in South Korea, dangerous heat has continued well into August. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

You may remember a couple of years ago, when a popular Japanese boy band came to Hawai‘i and brought thousands of visitors with them.  Now a South Korean boy band is coming—with a huge fan base.  HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Courtney Rhodes / Flickr
Courtney Rhodes / Flickr

Korean cosmetics are a growing draw for both locals and tourists visiting Hawai‘i. While O‘ahu now features three specialty stores, Korean cosmetics are also available on other islands. And now the overall business is attracting some big financial names. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

What’s your relationship with your phone? That may seem like an odd question, but it’s one that psychiatrists in South Korea are increasingly asking some of their patients. HPR’s Bill Dorman has details in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

We’re just past the peak season for commencement ceremonies at Hawai‘i’s high schools and universities. While higher education may be part of the plan for some graduates, education of a different kind is getting some attention in South Korea.  HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

A South Korean official says North Korea test-fired two missiles today….and both of them failed.  It’s the latest development in what has been an active time in the region. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Tensions are even higher than usual these days on the Korean peninsula.  Thursday’s failed missile launches are the latest in a series of test firings.  This past weekend, North Korean military officials said they launched a ballistic missile from a submarine…while western observers say an attempted launch a couple of weeks ago failed.

republic of Korea / Flickr
republic of Korea / Flickr

While the presidential campaign remains a focus in the United States, this was a big week for elections of a different kind in South Korea. Voters cast ballots for the national legislature—and the results surprised a lot of observers. HPR’s Bill Dorman has details in today’s Asia Minute.

Congress is gridlocked, and time is running out on the president’s term.  Sounds like the United States, but now it’s also true in South Korea.  President Park Geun-hye still has more than a year and a half left in office…but her legislative outlook just became a lot more challenging.

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay Commons

Tourism brings more than 8-million visitors to Hawai‘i each year--a fact that has attracted a number of international businesses looking to capitalize on brand exposure.  That includes companies selling Korean cosmetics.  It’s a niche that has led to several new stores in the state over the past few years—and continues to be a growing part of Korea’s international trade. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Chinese visitors are coming to Hawai‘i at about the same rate they were a year ago.  That’s according to figures released this week by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority. And those traveler numbers remain small compared to what’s happening in northeast Asia. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

One day this week, about 45,000 Chinese visitors sat down together in South Korea for a dinner of fried chicken and beer.  Reuters reports they came on 158 different flights from across China…part of a sales incentive trip by a cosmetics company.

DVIDSHUB / Flickr
DVIDSHUB / Flickr

The next primary election for both parties is less than a week away…in Wisconsin. While the campaigning continues, some of the rhetoric is getting attention from overseas---especially when it comes to Donald Trump’s views about Asia. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Donald Trump has told the New York Times that he’d consider withdrawing US forces from Japan and South Korea unless those countries pay more for their upkeep.  He also indicated he’d be willing to have Japan and South Korea develop nuclear weapons programs.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Yesterday, a week after North Korea tested a nuclear weapon - South Korean troops opened fire on a drone as it crossed the demilitarized zone from the north.  The Yonhap news agency reports that the unmanned aircraft turned back after about 20 shots. North and South Korea are also blasting propaganda at each other from huge loudspeakers along the DMZ; all part of a difficult week for South Korea's president, as we hear from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

Tourism is a growing business in many parts of the world—including South Korea. And as part of its campaign to attract more visitors, the capital city has adopted a new slogan. But not everyone is celebrating. HPR’s Bill Dorman has details in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Yesterday's agreement between South Korea and Japan came as welcome news in Washington.  The United States has long urged Tokyo and Seoul to resolve the issue of the "comfort women" - Korean women coerced into prostitution to service Japanese soldiers during the Second World War.  As we hear from Neal Conan in Today's Pacific News Minute, the agreement may be a step forward, but a long way from complete resolution.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The World Bank says exports make up nearly 14% of the US economy.  For South Korea, the percentage is more than triple that figure - making the economy dependent on trade.  HPR’s Bill Dorman recently returned from a reporting trip to South Korea with the East West Center and has more on the country’s economic picture in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The national legislative session remains stalled by partisanship. The president and lawmakers are trading accusations of playing politics with matters of national importance. And the main opposition party has been split by factional fighting. The description may sound like Washington D.C., but this scenario is playing out in South Korea. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

A little more than a week ago, tens of thousands of protestors packed the streets of downtown Seoul - calling for President Park Geun-hye to resign.

Bill Dorman
Bill Dorman

This Thursday, while Americans are celebrating Thanksgiving - officials from North and South Korea will meet for the first time since this summer.  HPR’s Bill Dorman recently returned from a ten-day program in South Korea with the East West Center and begins a week of reports with a look at the north/south divide in today’s Asia Minute.

The De-Militarized Zone may be one of the world’s most misleading phrases.

ayustety / Flickr
ayustety / Flickr

The Asia Pacific is the world’s largest region for beer consumption.  That’s according to Japan’s Kirin Brewery.  And while Japanese beers are famous in much of the world, another Asian country is pushing ahead with exports. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

A couple of months ago, South Korea’s exports saw their sharpest fall in six years - tumbling by nearly 15% from a year earlier.

mroach / Flickr
mroach / Flickr

Until an agreement yesterday, North and South Korea stood on the brink of war for the last several days. As usual, each accused the other of precipitating the crisis.  As a deadline approached at 5 PM Saturday, high level negotiators from both countries gathered at Panmunjom and after marathon talks, found a way to back down.  As we hear from Neal Conan in today's Pacific News Minute… this was just the latest in a long series of confrontations.

NIAID / Flickr
NIAID / Flickr

In South Korea, an outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome or “MERS” has widened to more than 100 people. The World Health Organization is working with the government, and so far has not issued any warnings about travel to South Korea. Even so, tourism is starting to feel an impact. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Expert Infantry / Flickr
Expert Infantry / Flickr

Over the past few weeks, North Korea claimed it test-fired a missile from a submarine, and a senior American officer said North Korean missiles are now able to strike the west coast of the United States with nuclear weapons. Then, last week, South Korea tried out a new missile of its own. Details from Neal Conan in today's Pacific News Minute.

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