Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

U.S. Geological Survey

A final decision on where the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory will be located remains months away, U.S. Interior Secretary David Bernhardt said last week during a visit to the Big Island.

U.S. Geological Survey

This Friday makes a year since Kīlauea erupted, sending lava into residential communities on Hawaiʻi Island. The event displaced about 2,000 people and claimed more than 700 homes in the Puna area of the Big Island. Many of the residents are still recovering. Among them are the scientists who monitor the volcano that could rumble to life at any time.

USGS

It's been nearly a year since Kīlauea erupted on the Big Island's lower East Rift Zone. The event destroyed more than 700 structures and displaced hundreds, if not thousands, of residents. Scientists are still studying the eruption, but they think they know what did, and didn't, cause it.

USGS-Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Hawai'i County officials say they were unaware that federal officials are considering moving the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory off the island where there are erupting volcanos.

Wikipedia

Scientists have downgraded the alert level for Hawaii's Kīlauea volcano in response to reduced activity, saying the next eruption is likely a few years away.

USGS

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory recently put out a preliminary lava thickness map, based on last summer’s Kilauea lava flow. They’ve created similar maps before, but mostly for official publications. Now this map is on the HVO web site.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

It’s been 33 years since Mauna Loa last erupted, but an alert level remains in place at the world’s largest active volcano. Scientists at Hawaiian Volcano Observatory raised the alert level two years ago. HPR Contributing Reporter Sherry Bracken says that although scientists say no eruption is imminent, they want Hawai'i Island residents to be aware of the likelihood of a future eruption.

skyseeker / Flickr
skyseeker / Flickr

Hawai'i Island’s Kīlauea Volcano gets a lot of attention with its two spectacular eruption locations. But the island’s dominant active volcano is also under close observation from scientists. We get details from HPR contributing reporter Sherry Bracken.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Hawaiian Island authorities are urging the public to keep a safe distance from lava entering the ocean.  Lava from the Pu‘u ‘ō‘ō vent continues to flow into the water near Kamokuna, and its attracting a lot of visitors.

But scientists with the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory say the new earth can build a fragile platform known as a “lava delta”.  The shelf can break off without warning… sending steam, boiling water and football sized molten rock in all directions.  Janet Babb is a scientist with the Hawai‘i Volcano Observatory.