haleakala

Department of Land and Natural Resources

Roads leading to the summit of Haleakalā are once again open to the public today. Park officials say the construction convoy delivering equipment for the new Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope was successful. This follows the latest round of protests against the solar telescope under construction. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports.

The Conversation: Friday, April 22nd, 2016

Apr 22, 2016
Flickr - Kenny Louie

Zero Waste Initiative at HPR; Storyteller Margaret Read McDonald; Global Climate Outlook; Haleakalā National Park Centennial

Zero Waste Initiative Follow Up: Ku’ulei Williams

This week we learn about how a Maui facility played a vital role in detecting an astronomical feature that factored into our Halloween weekend as HPR All Things Considered Host Dave Lawrence speaks with Christopher Phillips from the Mauna Kea Astronomy Outreach Committee for this week’s Stargazer.  

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  Nonviolent action has resulted in political change in recent history:  in the American South, in Gandhi’s India, and in South Africa, just a few examples.  Now the self-described “protectors” of Mauna Kea and Haleakalā are rallying around a call for “Kapu Aloha”, a nonviolent mode of conduct that organizers say guides their movement.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

“Active resistance through love, the consistency of that has been proven in many world conflict. Here is another one.”

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  Two of Hawai‘i’s celebrated mountains, Mauna Kea and Haleakalā, remain in the crosshairs of a battle that appears to pit preservation of culture against pursuit of science.  In both cases, the state and counties are being called upon to enforce state land board decisions, while challenges to those decisions are before the Hawai‘i Supreme Court.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa continues a look at Haleakalā, the issues and the mountain.

Noe Tanigawa

 

  

The very first telescope on Haleakalā was completed in 1958, and used for satellite tracking.  Three years later, 18 acres of ceded land at the summit were set aside for astronomy, becoming the Haleakalā High Altitude Observatory Site with the University of Hawai‘i as owner/manager.  Currently there are ten facilities on the mountain and another, a cutting edge solar telescope, is underway.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the controversy over its construction.