micronesian

Tim Tricas

University of Hawaii biologist Tim Tricas has been listening and recording the fantastic sounds of Hawaii's coral reef inhabitants; Kuleana filmmaker Brian Kohne tells us about the challenges of marketing an independent film; an interview with Fred Barberia, KTUH's first GM, on the station's 50th anniversary; the latest on the adoption scheme targeting vulnerable Micronesian mothers.

Wikimedia Commons

Right of Entry for Kakaako Makai Park Land; Howard Hughes, Kakaako’s Newest Build; Bike Community Updates; Stopping Building Without Permits; Plant-based Diet Helps Reverse Chronic Disease

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

Micronesians are Hawaiʻi’s newest and fastest growing immigrant population. For more than 30 years, citizens of Micronesia, the Marshall Islands, and Palau, moved to Hawaiʻi to seek greater opportunities for employment and education. And now, the voice of the next generation of this immigrant population is emerging. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports.

Melissa Lum & Pacific Students Media
Melissa Lum & Pacific Students Media

  Twelve groups of dancers from across Micronesia, craft demonstrations, a little marketplace, a Chamorro food truck, you will get an immersion in Micronesian culture tomorrow, 10-4, at the Honolulu Museum of Art School.  It's all part of the Celebrate Micronesia! Festival and HPR’s Noe Tanigawa discovered all that is just the tip of the iceberg.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

This week we've been looking at part of the legacy of a dozen years of U.S. nuclear testing in the South Pacific.  For survivors of those tests and their descendants, part of the story is medical treatment—and how to pay for it.  In her concluding report, Jackie Young looks at some possible solutions.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Hawai‘i 's Department of Human Services projects it will save about 29-million dollars a year by not providing insurance coverage for so-called able-bodied Micronesians of working age.  That group has been shifted to plans under the federal Affordable Care Act.  But healthcare advocates say the economics are more complicated.  Jackie Young has more in her continuing series about the lingering health costs of U.S. nuclear testing in the South Pacific.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The rising cost of health care is a concern for all Hawai‘i residents.  But one group in particular is facing added medical expenses.  About 10,000 Micronesians live in Hawai‘i.  They're at the center of an issue dating back to U.S. nuclear testing in the South Pacific.  This week, Jackie Young is taking a closer look at some of that history—and how it impacts us today.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

The deadline to enroll for insurance through the Affordable Care Act is this Sunday. That’s a special challenge for more than 7,500 immigrants from countries of the Compact of Free Association, including Micronesia. Starting March 1st, they’ll lose their Medicaid coverage, and will have to find insurance through the Hawai‘i Health Connector. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports on how the community is preparing for the shift.

The Hawai‘i Health Connector events for COFA residents are as follows:

Oahu

Lessons from Marshallese Poet Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner

Sep 3, 2014
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Not everyone growing up in the islands feels the spirit of aloha. The Micronesian experience in Hawai‘i is often defined by feelings of exclusion and discrimination. HPR’s Molly Solomon spoke with Marshallese poet Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner, whose writing sheds light on a voice not often heard.

Jetnil-Kijiner was recently selected to speak at the 2014 Climate Summit at the United Nations in New York this month. 

Micronesian Community Rally for Equal Health Care

Jun 9, 2014
www.healthypacific.org
www.healthypacific.org

It’s been 2 months since the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling on Micronesian health care benefits reverberated through the community. The court’s decision ruled in favor of the state, no longer requiring Hawaii to fund Medicaid for migrants from the island nations in Micronesia. But as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, for many the future still remains uncertain.