Noe Tanigawa

Arts & Culture Reporter

Noe Tanigawa covers art, culture, and ideas for Hawai'i Public Radio.    Noe began working in news at WQXR, the New York Times' classical station in New York City, where she also hosted music programs from 1990-94.  Prior to New York, Noe was a music host in jazz, rock, urban contemporary, and contemporary and classic Hawaiian music formats in Honolulu.  Since arriving at HPR in 2002, Noe has received awards from the Los Angeles Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists Hawai'i Chapter, and an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for coverage of the budget process at the Hawai'i State Legislature. Noe holds a Masters in Painting from UH Mānoa. She maintains an active painting practice, and has recently returned from a 2015 residency with the U.S. Art in Embassies program in Palau.  Noe is from Wailupe Valley in East O'ahu.

Ways to Connect

Academy for Creative Media; State Film Commissioner; Kawainui Apartments; Honolulu Chamber Music Society; Honolulu Printmakers; Chef Mark Oyama

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The absence of tourists in Hawai'i' is affecting Maui's housing market. The tourism  drop and its ripple effects are among the reasons over 900 homeless people were moved into permanent housing on Maui since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Service agencies are working harder now to keep people in the homes they currently have.

Noe Tanigawa

Chinatown Arts; Health Data, HiPAM Work Group; Hawaii’s Food Systems; History of Hawaii's Food Crisis; Initiative for Childhood Obesity; Chef Grant Sato

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The Covid-19 pandemic may have had something to do with the City’s decision to go ahead with the new Downtown Art Center, now set to go in above the Chinatown Satellite City Hall. New owners are in at Pegge Hopper's former site, too, but no one expects it to be easy.

Noe Tanigawa/HPR

Higher education is just one of the state functions about to be hit by budget shortfalls. The University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents is raising alarms about a nearly $100 million expected loss in revenue, possibly starting this November.  One critical piece of information is still needed for detailed planning. 

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COVID-19 infections at O'ahu's homeless shelters are putting more pressure on Honolulu's street population. HPD enforcements continue as options for safe shelter are decreasing. Encampments in Waimanalo and Waianae are being allowed to remain, while mobile testing on the street gets increased attention.

Noe Tanigawa

City and service providers fight over homeless sweeps; Joyful noise from youth chorus; COVID's effect on choral societies; Healing stones in Waikiki; Celebrating coconuts

Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Updated: 8/13/2020, 10:33 a.m.

COVID-19 cases are surging among prison inmates and expanding among the homeless, both of whose living conditions make spread of the virus especially difficult to control. According to the state Department of Health today, cases at the Oahu Community Correctional Center now number 92 inmates and 24 adult correctional officers who have tested positive. Nineteen homeless in Oahu shelters and related programs have done so as well. The OCCC numbers helped push the state daily total today to a record 355 cases. Two Oahu men also died, health officials said. That brought Hawaii's coronavirus death count to 40.

Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/AmirHanna-13279918/?utm_source=link-attribution&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=4397860">Amir Hanna</a>

Update from the Hawaii Restaurant Association; What restaurants will look like after the COVID crisis; Inside the daily decisions of a restaurateur; ALEA Bridge helps Central Oahu homeless; Call for artists for Maui Quick Build projects

noe tanigawa

The newest tightening of COVID-19 precautions around the state did not include greater restrictions on restaurant operations. While that surprised some, even without further restrictions, Hawai'i restaurants have been hard hit, and are bracing for more.

Noe Tanigawa

HPD's POST facility for Oahu's homeless; Kimi Howl Lee on her film Kamaaina; Art Bar; Professor talks K-Pop and politics; Maui luthier Steve Grimes

noe tanigawa

A key part of Honolulu’s homeless strategy lies in a scrubby field off Lagoon Drive at Ke’ehi Lagoon Park. That’s where the Honolulu Police Department has set up a COVID-19 isolation center where, currently, up to 100 homeless clients can maintain social distancing while they decide what their next steps might be. The city considers the project highly successful in getting people off the street.

WCCHC

Tomorrow, 1,500 families will eat well after the Wai’anae Coast Comprehensive Health Center’s food box giveaway. Since the Covid-19 crisis hit, the center has been working overtime to make sure keiki, kupuna, and other vulnerable members in their large community are not forgotten. Transportation, isolation, and poverty are among  the barriers faced by residents of O’ahu’s leeward coast.

Noe Tanigawa / Hawai'i Public Radio

Honolulu is using federal COVID-19 funds to clean up Chinatown and boost businesses that are hurting without downtown office workers. On Saturday, to help boost business, the city opened Hotel Street for pedestrians, bicyclists and dining on the sidewalk. But challenges remain for the neighborhood’s future. 

Noe Tanigawa

Chinatown Recovery and Resilience; Reviving and Reworking the Arts in Hawaii; Tough Times for Hawaii's Charter Fishermen; Aaron Mahi Talk Story

DIY American Dream

Jul 3, 2020

 

 

On this Independence Day holiday, we remember the different threads of history, culture, and experience that are woven together in American life. National immigration issues play out every day in Honolulu, a notoriously difficult business environment in the best of times. On Honolulu's culinary scene, a Turkish family's dream of a restaurant is coming true, in spite of the pandemic.

Today Testing (for derivative) / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)

Covid-19 quarantine measures have sparked a massive migration online and for many people it's a vast and unfamiliar world. According to the Pew Research Center, researchers are concerned about issues from digital democracy to online dating. In Hawai'i, online issues and activity are keeping pace with the nation.

Loretta Sheehan on police reform discussion; Art as a tool for community benefit; Artist as innovator and visionary; Local theatre roundup

Noe Tanigawa / hawaii public radio

This week, questions have been raised about discrepancies in the Honolulu Police Department’s "use of force" reports, resulting in an undercount of deaths involving police. This comes as protests across America have focused on police reform. Loretta Sheehan chaired the Honolulu Police Commission until January, and discussed what changes could look like at HPD.

Photo by form PxHere

Food services reopen; Reactions from Chinatown; Artist Lauren Trangmar

Noe Tanigawa

Kaua’i, Maui and Hawai’i counties allowed restaurants to open June 1, with social distancing protocols in place, including requiring face masks until diners are seated. O’ahu eateries are reopening today and restaurant industry insiders say factors crucial to their success are not under their control.

Noe Tanigawa / Hawai’i Public Radio

While most Americans have been consumed with worries about family, health and livelihoods, political scientists and others have raised concerns about how America’s democracy may be changed by the global pandemic. 

 

 

Agricultural Research Service / U.S. Department of Agriculture

Nurturing ag to fill Big Island need; Keeping kupuna fed; Sustainable ag systems; Aina Aloha Economic Futures Declaration; Updates on Hawaii arts groups; Kupuna wisdom

Hawai'i's hurricane season starts up again June first, and runs through the end of November. This year, the National Weather Service is predicting between two and six tropical cyclones in the Central Pacific. Experts on Hawai’i’s food systems say, we need to prepare for multiple simultaneous disasters. Here's a look at some of their priorities.

Ray_LAC/Flickr

In this Aloha Friday episode, it's all about the arts and food! The Honolulu Museum of Art and Bishop Museum's plan for re-opening after the Governor's shutdown order is lifted, how the public can help after our local longline fishing industry crashed, a check-in with Maui County's foodbank, and great tips for cooking while quarantined.

CDC Instagram

In March, as U.S. officials discussed the so-called "China virus," the FBI warned about an increase in anti-Asian bias as a result of Asians being blamed for the COVID-19 pandemic. Earlier this week, a Center for Public Integrity poll showed 30% of Americans have witnessed bias incidents against Asians. As the economy struggles, experts expect these incidents to increase.

Noe Tanigawa / Hawai'i Public Radio

To date, only one homeless person in Hawai‘i has tested positive for the coronavirus. That person was connected to the cluster at Maui Memorial Hospital. On O‘ahu, home to 4,450 homeless individuals, service providers are seeing a lot of movement on the street during this COVID-19 shutdown.  Here's what the experts see ahead.

COVID-19's effect on Hawaii's homeless; Art takes a hit in crisis but organizations pivot; Environmentalists fear plastic return amid coronavirus crisis; Author Kawai Strong Washburn discusses debut novel; Serenity now

Flickr/Governor David Ige

Meet the doctor tapped to help the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency during the COVID-19 crisis, HPR reporter Noe Tanigawa discusses how local small businesses are grappling with the economic shutdown, kupuna get help from a grassroots volunteer organization, and American Sign Language interpreters shine in the spotlight. 

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