Noe Tanigawa

Arts & Culture Reporter

Noe Tanigawa covers art, culture, and ideas for Hawai'i Public Radio.    Noe began working in news at WQXR, the New York Times' classical station in New York City, where she also hosted music programs from 1990-94.  Prior to New York, Noe was a music host in jazz, rock, urban contemporary, and contemporary and classic Hawaiian music formats in Honolulu.  Since arriving at HPR in 2002, Noe has received awards from the Los Angeles Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists Hawai'i Chapter, and an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for coverage of the budget process at the Hawai'i State Legislature. Noe holds a Masters in Painting from UH Mānoa. She maintains an active painting practice, and has recently returned from a 2015 residency with the U.S. Art in Embassies program in Palau.  Noe is from Wailupe Valley in East O'ahu.

Ways to Connect

Chinatown Recovery and Resilience; Reviving and Reworking the Arts in Hawaii; Tough Times for Hawaii's Charter Fishermen; Aaron Mahi Talk Story

DIY American Dream

Jul 3, 2020

 

 

On this Independence Day holiday, we remember the different threads of history, culture, and experience that are woven together in American life. National immigration issues play out every day in Honolulu, a notoriously difficult business environment in the best of times. On Honolulu's culinary scene, a Turkish family's dream of a restaurant is coming true, in spite of the pandemic.

Today Testing (for derivative) / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)

Covid-19 quarantine measures have sparked a massive migration online and for many people it's a vast and unfamiliar world. According to the Pew Research Center, researchers are concerned about issues from digital democracy to online dating. In Hawai'i, online issues and activity are keeping pace with the nation.

Loretta Sheehan on police reform discussion; Art as a tool for community benefit; Artist as innovator and visionary; Local theatre roundup

Noe Tanigawa / hawaii public radio

This week, questions have been raised about discrepancies in the Honolulu Police Department’s "use of force" reports, resulting in an undercount of deaths involving police. This comes as protests across America have focused on police reform. Loretta Sheehan chaired the Honolulu Police Commission until January, and discussed what changes could look like at HPD.

Photo by form PxHere

Food services reopen; Reactions from Chinatown; Artist Lauren Trangmar

Noe Tanigawa

Kaua’i, Maui and Hawai’i counties allowed restaurants to open June 1, with social distancing protocols in place, including requiring face masks until diners are seated. O’ahu eateries are reopening today and restaurant industry insiders say factors crucial to their success are not under their control.

Noe Tanigawa / Hawai’i Public Radio

While most Americans have been consumed with worries about family, health and livelihoods, political scientists and others have raised concerns about how America’s democracy may be changed by the global pandemic. 

 

 

Agricultural Research Service / U.S. Department of Agriculture

Nurturing ag to fill Big Island need; Keeping kupuna fed; Sustainable ag systems; Aina Aloha Economic Futures Declaration; Updates on Hawaii arts groups; Kupuna wisdom

Hawai'i's hurricane season starts up again June first, and runs through the end of November. This year, the National Weather Service is predicting between two and six tropical cyclones in the Central Pacific. Experts on Hawai’i’s food systems say, we need to prepare for multiple simultaneous disasters. Here's a look at some of their priorities.

Ray_LAC/Flickr

In this Aloha Friday episode, it's all about the arts and food! The Honolulu Museum of Art and Bishop Museum's plan for re-opening after the Governor's shutdown order is lifted, how the public can help after our local longline fishing industry crashed, a check-in with Maui County's foodbank, and great tips for cooking while quarantined.

CDC Instagram

In March, as U.S. officials discussed the so-called "China virus," the FBI warned about an increase in anti-Asian bias as a result of Asians being blamed for the COVID-19 pandemic. Earlier this week, a Center for Public Integrity poll showed 30% of Americans have witnessed bias incidents against Asians. As the economy struggles, experts expect these incidents to increase.

Noe Tanigawa / Hawai'i Public Radio

To date, only one homeless person in Hawai‘i has tested positive for the coronavirus. That person was connected to the cluster at Maui Memorial Hospital. On O‘ahu, home to 4,450 homeless individuals, service providers are seeing a lot of movement on the street during this COVID-19 shutdown.  Here's what the experts see ahead.

COVID-19's effect on Hawaii's homeless; Art takes a hit in crisis but organizations pivot; Environmentalists fear plastic return amid coronavirus crisis; Author Kawai Strong Washburn discusses debut novel; Serenity now

Flickr/Governor David Ige

Meet the doctor tapped to help the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency during the COVID-19 crisis, HPR reporter Noe Tanigawa discusses how local small businesses are grappling with the economic shutdown, kupuna get help from a grassroots volunteer organization, and American Sign Language interpreters shine in the spotlight. 

Noe Tanigawa / Hawai'i Public Radio

This week has brought the harsh reality of social isolation into focus for Hawai‘i’s businesses.  State unemployment filings are now equal to over a third of Hawai‘i’s workforce. For businesses with fewer than 500 employees that make up 99% of all businesses here, the impact of COVID-19 is particularly acute. Here's an inside look at what businesses are going through.

Casey Harlow / HPR

On today's Aloha Friday edition: the Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relation's new program matching workers needing a job with industries looking for workers, revisiting the 1900 Chinatown Fire with local fire protection consultant, COVID-19's effect on gun sales in the islands, and Ram Dass's Love Serve Remember Foundation's Raghu Markus talks about mindfulness in during the current coronavirus crisis.

CDC: Cover Up!

Apr 7, 2020
Masks4Hawaii

Local companies were making cloth masks even before the CDC guidance to wear face masks last Friday. Now, however, they’re pretty much sold out. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports the healthcare sector still needs protective equipment of every kind, but there are options for the average person who needs a cloth mask.

CC BY-SA 2.0

Some 161,000 Hawai’i residents filed for unemployment in March.  The University of Hawai‘i’s economic research arm, UHERO, projected unemployment could temporarily spike to 25 percent due to the impact of COVID-19 on the economy.  In Hawai‘i, however, some companies need even more workers.

GoFarms Hawaii
GoFarms Hawaii

Getting local food to you during stay at home orders; Staying healthy during the COVID-19 crisis; Helping the homeless during the pandemic; A note on HPR's coronavirus coverage

Tens of thousands of bar and restaurant employees across Hawai‘i have been laid off in the wake of COVID-19 restaurant closings. Some restaurants have trimmed staff, but managed to transition to take- out or delivery service. Hawai‘i’s food supply and distribution systems may depend on how many restaurants can be kept open.

Noe Tanigawa / Hawai'i Public Radio

As people learn new habits in response to concerns about the novel coronavirus, where and how people get good food is high on the list of new challenges.

Noe Tanigawa / Hawai'i Public Radio

County regulations that prohibit restaurant dining go into effect on O‘ahu and Maui today. As meal service and wait staff hit the unemployment lines, restaurants and bars that are able are switching to takeout and delivery only. 

Free image / Pixabay

The Covid 19 pandemic is highlighting the risks and benefits of being so physically and virtually connected across the globe. Like a virus, information has many avenues by which to travel quickly these days. Here, a communications expert discusses best practices for steering through the deluge of information you may be experiencing.

pxHere

Struggles of houseless students; Hunting Mushrooms on the Big Island; Update on COVID-19; Lost sounds of Hawaii's native birds; Honolulu Art Ensemble debut

Jasperdo / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Cruise ships entering Honolulu Harbor may not be a welcome sight right now, but in the 1950s and 1960s, Boat Days were a cause for celebration. Many of the passengers aboard based their visions of Hawai‘i on the songs they heard on film and radio. In those days, visitors could choose from the Tapa Room, Chuck’s Cellar, Duke’s, and many other live music venues featuring fine singers of the day.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Chozen-ji, the Zen temple in Kalihi valley, was known as a center for Honolulu powerbrokers in the 1980’s and 90’s.  Political and business deals were reportedly hashed out around a low table, in front of calligraphy by Miyamoto Musashi.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa visited recently as they prepare for an open house and art exhibition.

Laura Beltran-Villamizar / NPR

NPR’s Tiny Desk Concerts have become a powerful launch pad for musicians, since they started in 2008. Its most popular video, of Anderson Paak, has racked up more than forty million views. Bob Boilen, host of All Songs Considered, curates the series, which has helped millions of listeners discover new artists. Now, a musician from Hawai‘i has made the cut.

Thanks to  Pow!Wow! Hawai‘i 2020, there are more than fifty new murals in Kaka‘ako, from the Children’s Discovery Center to Ward Theatres, to Mother Waldron Park. The street murals are the most visible evidence of a small business shift in the area.  Developer Christian O'Connor discusses how the huge changes in Kaka‘ako are supposed to work for Honolulu as a whole.

Box Jelly-Dentsu Collaboration; Keeping up with Kaka'ako; Lāna`i: Nelinia Cabiles; Moloka’i: Kanoelani Davis; Hawai’i: Hiroki Morinoue; Toni Lee and Hawaiian Voices

Pages