hawaii history

Menehune! Where?

Dec 28, 2018
creative commons
creative commons

A lifelong educator, the late Frederick “Bruce” Wichman was a descendent of the Rice family of Kaua‘i.  He began collecting stories and legends, especially about the Hā‘ena area, when he was a child.  In 2013, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa met him one evening in Kōke‘e where he had a home.  In part two of a look at Menehune, Hawai‘i’s “little people,” Wichman described them as short, and stocky, among other things.

Department of Land and Natural Resources

Past Present and Future: we take a look at the Ecology of Waikiki. We bring back voices of the past and also look at the challenges ahead as we move into 2019 and beyond.

Recorded stories-- oral histories of a special place tied to our economic engine and voices that need to be heard as we navigate solutions to climate change and rising sea levels.

It’s a chance to share your memories about Oahu’s south shore or your worries about we need to do now and what we leave for our children.

Our guests today were:

Ryan Finnerty

“No True Hawaiian Will Evade It.” That was the headline of a two-page newspaper ad penned by Queen Lili’uokalani and Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalaniana’ole in 1917. They were encouraging residents of territorial Hawaii to donate to the Red Cross following America’s entry into World War I. 

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Hawai‘i’s last Queen, Lili‘uokalani, was born September 2, 1838, and died November 11, 1917.  The centennial commemoration of her death is beginning this weekend at ‘Iolani Palace with a free celebration of her music, and an exhibit of revealing artifacts is also underway at UH Hamilton Library.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

One of the great pleasures of living in a place, is learning the stories about its nooks and crannies.  In HPR’s Hometown collection, we visit places of historical or cultural interest  that may be easy to miss.  Today in Hometown Honolulu, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa visits a memorial right outside the State Archives, and a petroglyph site in Nu‘uanu.

Oahu Community Correction Center
Oahu Community Correction Center

One of the last and most notable executions to take place in Hawai‘i occurred 87 years ago tomorrow.   The case attracted national attention and divided ethnic communities.

In September of 1928… Myles Fukunaga confessed to abducting and killing 10-year-old George Gill Jamieson, the son of a prominent white businessman.  He told police he wanted to use the ransom money to send his parents back to Japan….and save them from a life of poverty in Hawaii.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

There’s new movement on plans to restore the Old Maui High School.

A company called TEACH Development has been tapped by Maui County officials to rebuild remaining structure. Teach stands for technology, education, agriculture, community and health.  In a meeting last week they pledged to work closely with the community to achieve plans to create an environmental education center within the historic architecture.  The limited liability corporation was formed for the project, and was chosen by Mayor Alan Arakawa’s administration through a request for proposal process.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The fate of a historic tall ship moored in Honolulu Harbor could be left up to the state.

The 138-year-old Falls of Clyde has been moored in Honolulu Harbor for more than 50 years at pier 7.  Built in 1878 the ship is the last surviving iron-hulled ships with a four mast full rigging.  In her prime, she served the Matson Company as a passenger ship, making runs between the Hawaiian Islands and San Francisco before being modified into an oil tanker.   Se survived two scuttling attempts in 1963 and then again in 2008.

DLNR
DLNR

Two tourists from Texas stumbled onto a collection of Hawaiian petroglyphs in Wai‘anae.  Sands shifted by the tide revealed at least 17 figures, stretching over roughly 60 of beach.  While the figures may have been seen in the past… it’s the first time the State Historic Preservation Division of the Department of Land and Natural Resources is documenting the site.

The Trust for Public Land
The Trust for Public Land

Restoration work has begun on the Kuamoʻo battlefield and burial grounds on Hawai‘i Island.  The 47 acres of land south of Kona was purchased earlier this year through a partnership between The Trust for Public Land and managing group- Kuamoʻo ʻĀina.

Iolani Palace
Iolani Palace

The public will get a glimpse into the lives and fashions of Hawai‘i’s monarchs.

The Friends of Iolani Palace are unveiling the first dress in their Ali‘i Gown Reproduction project.  Big Island historic dress designer Iris Viacrusis was commissioned to reproduce the clothing based on photographs and artifacts.  There are currently three gowns being reproduced including the lei hulu and peacock gowns worn by Queen Kapi‘olani, and ostrich feather gown worn by Queen Lili‘uokalani.

HURL/ University of Hawaii.
HURL/ University of Hawaii.

Scientists with UH’s School of Ocean, Earth Science and Technology have recovered the bell from a Japanese WW2 submarine sunk off of O‘ahu.

Te Papa Tongarewa
Te Papa Tongarewa

    

A set of artifacts present at the contact between Native Hawaiians and Captain Cook are on their way back to the islands.

The Trust for Public Land
The Trust for Public Land

A historical area of land on the Southern Coast of Hawai‘i Island will be protected from development.

The Kuamo‘o battlefield and burial grounds cover forty-seven acres of land south of Kona.  In 1819- the Nephew of Kamehameha the first clashed with Liholiho over keeping the traditional Kapu system of order in place.  Liholiho was victorious, but many warriors from both sides perished in battle and were buried on the property.

 PMNM
PMNM

Scientists are connecting a Hollywood movie with a shipwreck in the North Hawaiian Islands.

In 1823 a Nantucket whaling ship called the Two Brothers ran aground on the reef in the French Frigate shoals- north of the Hawaiian Islands. Its captain was George Pollard Jr. – Survivor of the Essex- the ship wrecked by a sperm whale which became the inspiration for Herman Melville’s novel Moby Dick, or The Whale.

paepaeoheeia
paepaeoheeia

Around 1,000 people are expected to gather in a few weeks to put the finishing touches on a historic Hawaiian fishpond. 

The Pani Ka Puka campaign has worked to restore the wall of the Paepae o He’eia fishpond in Kāne‘ohe bay. The organization has been working to restore the pond for more than thirteen years, and this event will complete and enclose the pond.  The project allows the community to learn the traditional Hawaiian aquaculture practice of trapping and raising fish.

Honolulu Museum of Art
Honolulu Museum of Art

  

  Hawaiian history buffs will have one last chance to view a beautiful artifact with a tragic history.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

  

A new book is shedding light on how sailors exploring Polynesia were able to communicate with the locals.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Hawaii has a long history of cultural blending and ethnic pride. That extends to the business world as well, with a vibrant community of ethnic chambers of commerce. From Pacific Business News, Editor in Chief A. Kam Napier has more.

State Library of Queensland
State Library of Queensland

Researchers with the University of Hawaii’s Marine Heritage Program have discovered a “Ghost Ship” off of Oahu.  The wreckage of the USS Kailua sits about 20 miles off the coast of Waikiki in 2,000 feet of water.   The ship was originally named the USS Dickerson and served as a cable ship between Hawaii and Midway before being used by the US Navy.  When no longer needed, the ship was used as torpedo target practice and sunk in 1946, its location forgotten until now.

noe tanigawa

This Sunday, men and women of all ages will gather to celebrate the lives and accomplishments of women in Hawai’i.  This year, the “Distinctive Women in Hawaiian History Program” focuses on women of a pivotal period:  World War II.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.