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US Fish and Wildlife Service sued for not protecting 49 Native Hawaiian species

The ʻakikiki bird is endangered and only found on Kauaʻi.
Courtesy Kauaʻi Forest Bird Recovery Project
The ʻakikiki bird is endangered and only found on Kauaʻi.

The Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for not designating a critical habitat for 49 Native Hawaiian plants and animals.

A critical habitat is a geographical area essential for a species requiring conservation.

When the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service defines a species as endangered, it is required to consult with other federal agencies to create a conservation plan.

The Center for Biological Diversity is accusing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for not acting fast enough for the 49 Hawaiian plants and animals that were added to the endangered species list in 2016.

The list includes 39 plants and 10 animals such as the ʻakēʻakē bird and Maui reedgrass.

The Center is calling for the Service to ensure critical habitats for endangered Native Hawaiian species.

Zoe Dym is a news producer at Hawaiʻi Public Radio.
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