rising sea level

Ashley Mizuo

The City and County of Honolulu is the second county to announce plans to sue fossil fuel companies for what officials say is damage caused by climate change and rising sea levels traced back to corporate action or inaction.

accarrino / Flickr

In 2012, the city of Hoboken, New Jersey experienced flooding in excess of 9 feet above normal levels. The city of 50,000 people, which sits just across the Hudson River from Manhattan, had sustained a nearly direct hit from a Category 3 hurricane. One source of flooding was a long-forgotten river, which had been paved over decades earlier.

Christian Haugen / Creative Commons / Flickr

Both Australia and New Zealand have revamped their Pacific policies this past year, partly to counteract China’s growing influence, and partly to address the inevitable effects of climate change. New Zealand’s foreign minister and a former Australian prime minister offered proposals for low-lying island countries recently.

The Diary of a Hotel Addict / CC BY-SA 2.0 / Flickr

Each week seems to produce more news about climate change. This week a United Nations report said global carbon emissions will rise by nearly 3-percent this year. Rising sea levels also continue around the world. And one major city in Southeast Asia faces a new urgency about flooding.

SOEST
SOEST

In a continuing discussion about climate change, there are  opportunities and challenges in the year ahead.  Today, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa speaks with Chip Fletcher, Associate Dean at UH Mānoa, and a professor of geology and geophysics.  His research shows water creeping inland and seeping up into neighborhoods sooner than you might think.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Three Asian countries that are often rivals have agreed to cooperate when it comes to the Arctic Ocean. China, Japan and South Korea will conduct a joint mission to take a closer look at the impacts of climate change. And the work is not only focused on science. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

ravilacoya / Flickr
ravilacoya / Flickr

A study in the Solomon Islands by researchers from Australia found that five small islands have vanished, while six others lost significant acreage due to sea level rise. The authors say it's the first scientific confirmation of the dramatic impact of climate change...we have more, from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

Michele Reynolds/USGS
Michele Reynolds/USGS

Rising sea level and climate change could leave some atolls in the Pacific and Indian Ocean uninhabitable. That’s according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. And as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, researchers worry that could happen sooner than you think.

The study was recently published in Nature’s Scientific Reports journal.

Wikipedia
Wikipedia

Last week, the Bikini Council approved resolutions, asking the U.S. Government for help to relocate, yet again. The population of the famous atoll was evacuated ahead of nuclear weapons tests in the 1940s, their home remains radioactive and their island of exile has been inundated by high waves at least five times in the last four years. More from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

Climate Change Report Shows Hawaii Sites at Risk

May 20, 2014
Flickr / Rosa Say
Flickr / Rosa Say

The affects of climate change are putting many of our country’s most iconic landmarks and cultural sites at risk. That’s according to a new report released today by the Union of Concerned Scientists. They say rising sea levels, coastal erosion and increased flooding are threatening national parks across the nation…including two here in Hawaii. HPR’s Molly Solomon has more. 

Sea Level Rise Legislation Being Introduced

Jan 14, 2014
Wayne Yoshioka

The State Legislature convenes tomorrow and lawmakers are expected to introduce about 3-thousand bills for consideration.   As HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka reports, one of the measures receiving broad-based support has to do with rising sea levels.  

Can the Hawaiian Monk Seal Survive Rising Sea Levels?

Dec 12, 2013
Flickr / f//stop
Flickr / f//stop

Hundreds of endangered species may be threatened due to rising sea-levels brought on by climate change. That’s according to a new report by the Center for Biological Diversity. And as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, one of the animals most at risk calls Hawaii home.