U.S.

Mark Herlihy / U.S. Air Force

President Trump is spending Memorial Day in Japan. He spent part of the day visiting U.S. forces there — a reminder of how many U.S. servicemen and women are spending this Memorial Day in the Asia Pacific.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Andy Dunaway

Two of America’s closest allies in the Western Pacific have challenged the facade of U.S. strategic policy. While American officials insist that the Indo-Pacific Strategy is not aimed at any individual country, the leaders of Palau and the Marshall Islands named China as the source of military and economic threats in the region.

D. Myles Cullen / Official White House Photos

President Trump is heading to Japan this week. He’s also going back next month for a meeting of regional leaders, but the trip starting later this week may have less policy substance than photo opportunities.

Ad Meskens / CC BY-SA 3.0 / Wikimedia Commons

Leaders of three Pacific Island countries are in Washington today to meet with President Donald Trump. Palau, the Marshall Islands, and the Federated States of Micronesia operate under Compacts of Free Association with the U.S.

John Pavelka / CC BY 2.0 / Flickr

North Korea has demanded that the United States release a cargo ship seized for violation of United Nations sanctions. A statement from the North Korean foreign ministry described the seizure as a ‘blatant act of robbery” and a “gangster-like act.” The ship has been towed to American Samoa.

Buonasera / Wikimedia Commons

While U.S. stocks are trading higher this morning, trade tensions with China remain a concern for world financial markets. And there are further complications in the Asia Pacific.

Chief Mass Communication Specialist Keith Deviney / U.S. Navy

USNI News reports that Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan will unveil a new Indo-Pacific Strategy at the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore later this month.

Shealah Craighead / White House

The president of South Korea is coming to the White House this week. Moon Jae-in will in Washington for two days, and the focus will be on what comes next with North Korea.

PAC Tom Sperduto / U.S. Coast Guard

On Monday, a U.S. Navy Destroyer and a Coast Guard Cutter made a transit of the Taiwan Strait. That’s the fifth time in the past six months that American warships have made the controversial passage between Taiwan and mainland China, but the first time that the Coast Guard has been involved.

Martin Falbisoner / CC BY-SA 3.0 / Wikimedia Commons

Australia’s ABC reports that two senior members of the National Security Council made a rare visit to the Pacific last week, with stops in Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. The trip is seen as the latest sign that the United States plans to challenge China’s growing influence.

Nishant Vyas / Creative Commons / Pexels

The United States and China are still negotiating about trade. While businesses and markets wait for developments on that front, another trading partner in the region is facing a disruption.

Sonata(talk / Contributions) / Wikimedia Commons

Denny Tamaki, the governor of Okinawa, plans to meet with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as soon as this Friday, to present him with the results of this past weekend’s referendum. 72-percent on Okinawa voted against a long-standing plan to relocate a U.S. Marine air base. The referendum is non-binding, but the decision to go ahead with construction may have repercussions.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Marc Castaneda / U.S. Navy

One of the world’s largest multinational military exercises has been underway for more than a week. It hasn’t captured many headlines in the United States, but American forces from across the Asia Pacific are taking part.

Matti Blume / Wikimedia Commons

There’s a trans-Pacific trade controversy that’s been building for years between the United States and one of its leading trade partners. This one has nothing to do with China, but it does affect a major American company — and shows that international trade rules don’t always keep up with market conditions.

Shealah Craighead
The White House / Flickr

President Trump covered a lot of ground in his State of the Union address this week — including trade issues with China. A U.S. delegation is heading to China next week for another round of talks, but a tariff deadline is fast approaching.

Senior Airman Dana Hill / U.S. Air Force

During his State of the Union address last night, President Trump announced he’ll be meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Vietnam at the end of the month. In another regional development, the United States and South Korea have apparently reached a deal on financing U.S. troops on the Korean peninsula.

Official U.S. Navy Page / Flickr

You may have heard on the news that the United States filed charges yesterday against the Chinese telecommunications company Huawei and its Chief Financial Officer. Tomorrow, the two countries start high stakes negotiations on the on-going trade war. And both the U.S. and China continue military displays in the Western Pacific.

Craig Nagy / Flickr

A Chinese trade delegation is heading to Washington this week for two days of meetings with U.S. officials. The discussions take place as a series of American companies are reporting that slower growth in China’s economy is hurting their profits—and that impact is also being felt in the Asia Pacific.

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton / U.S. Air Force

A C-130 named after General Douglas MacArthur carried a part of the Philippines’ history home this week. The United States returned three bells seized as war booty in 1901 in a ceremony broadcast live on Philippine television.

The White House / Flickr

The Group of Twenty meeting in Argentina wrapped up this weekend — generating a number of headlines. But there were also some smaller stories that may be significant in the long term. And that includes an unusual bit of diplomacy involving three countries.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

When the APEC Summit failed to agree on what’s usually a routine final statement over the weekend, much of the blame was leveled at differences between the United States and China on trade. But the two great powers were competing on many levels.

The White House / Flickr

The politics of trade remain a top priority for the Trump Administration, and that is having an impact on the rest of the Asia Pacific. Vice President Mike Pence represented the United States at the recent APEC meetings, which in many ways set the stage for another international gathering later this month.

Steven Byles / Flickr

Congress won’t be back in session until after Election Day. But before leaving Washington, lawmakers allowed an action to go ahead that’s likely to raise some objections in China.

Michael Day / Flickr

The United States and North Korea are quietly continuing talks about denuclearization. But South Korea’s government is moving faster toward cooperation on some projects with the North. And that’s drawing a reaction from the United States.

Leonidl / Wikimedia Commons

The United States is facing a diplomatic complication this week with one of its allies in the Asia Pacific. It follows a top-level meeting on Friday — and the outcome remains uncertain.

JohnAdamsj / Pixabay

The continuing trade dispute between the United States and China is starting to hit a variety of products.  Last week, the Trump Administration slapped ten-percent tariffs on another 200-billion dollars of Chinese imports. One area that’s feeling the pinch: seafood.

Buonasera / Wikimedia Commons

The issue of trade remains a topic for the Trump Administration with several countries, especially China. And a leading regional financial institution says that ongoing dispute will soon begin to have a wider impact.

Rytut / Wikipedia

President Trump is in Europe this week, but on the policy front it’s been another week of trade talk about China. His administration has listed another 200-billion dollars of Chinese goods that could be subject to tariffs. So far, most of this dispute has not directly touched Hawaii—but that could change.

Senior Airman Dana Hill / U.S. Air Force

Government officials from the United States and South Korea are still trying to figure out the details of President Trump’s promise to pull back from military exercises on the Korean peninsula. The development surprised military officials in both Washington and Seoul.

Goodtiming8871 / Wikimedia Commons

We’re just a few days away from President Trump’s scheduled meeting with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un in Singapore. And while global attention has been focused on these two leaders, several others will be affected by whatever takes place in Singapore.

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