kilauea eruption

Janice Wei / National Park Service

Today marks a year since the Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park reopened its doors to visitors following the 2018 Kīlauea eruption that destroyed homes, closed roadways and disrupted the lives of the community. Now, the park has marked another milestone.

Puna Geothermal Venture / Facebook page

Hawaii’s only geothermal power plant is still on track to resume operations before the end of the year. Puna Geothermal Venture has been shuttered since the 2018 Kilauea volcanic eruption.

United States Geological Survey

The County of Hawai‘i has launched a new website to provide more accurate, up-to-date information about programs and efforts to recover from the 2018 Kīlauea eruption.

Wikimedia Commons

HILO — Kilauea eruption victims who were ruled ineligible have been asked to return federal disaster relief payments, officials said.

K. Mulliken / USGS

U. S. Sen. Mazie Hirono announced on Thursday that the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory will remain on Hawaii Island following a commitment she said she received from the director of the U.S. Geological Survey.

MaxPixel

Hawaii Island took an economic hit following last year’s natural disasters, and the recovery has been a slow one. Miles Yoshioka is the Executive Officer of the Hawaii Island Chamber of Commerce. In a recent op-ed he made the case for increasing the Big Island’s economic resilience by expanding the astronomy industry.

Wikimedia Commons

Disaster Recovery and Spending; Diversifying Hawaii Island’s Economy; Governor Ige Mulls Bills for Signature

Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi

The Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park is home to Kīlauea, the world’s most active volcano. Its eruption last year and the earthquakes and ash explosions that followed forced the park to close for four months. With the eruption now over, visitors have been returning in droves again. Officials see this as an opportunity to plan for better management of the park for the future. 

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

 

 

A year ago today, lava began flowing from steaming ground cracks in Leilani Estates in Puna on the Big Island. This led to a destructive volcanic eruption lasting three months – and some Hawaiʻi Island residents are still trying to recover.

U.S. Geological Survey

This Friday makes a year since Kīlauea erupted, sending lava into residential communities on Hawaiʻi Island. The event displaced about 2,000 people and claimed more than 700 homes in the Puna area of the Big Island. Many of the residents are still recovering. Among them are the scientists who monitor the volcano that could rumble to life at any time.

USGS

It's been nearly a year since Kīlauea erupted on the Big Island's lower East Rift Zone. The event destroyed more than 700 structures and displaced hundreds, if not thousands, of residents. Scientists are still studying the eruption, but they think they know what did, and didn't, cause it.

USGS/M. Poland

The Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority plans to reallocate $2.5 million to market the Big Island to Mainland and Japan visitors following a sharp dropoff in tourists in the wake of last year's Kīlauea volcano eruption.

Wikipedia

Survivors of the Kilauea eruption have said they want to return to their homes despite incomplete restoration work in the area.

U.S. Geological Survey

It’s been more than ten months since a lava flow devastated parts of lower Puna on Hawaiʻi Island. More than 700 structures were lost, and the event disrupted other parts of life for many residents. And that includes small businesses in the area – which are now getting some help from a unique combination of organizations.

U.S. Geological Survey

A new webpage will connect Big Island residents affected by last year's Kīlauea eruption with recovery resources.

USGS

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory recently put out a preliminary lava thickness map, based on last summer’s Kilauea lava flow. They’ve created similar maps before, but mostly for official publications. Now this map is on the HVO web site.

Wayne Yoshioka

A group of sightseers injured by a "lava bomb" during a boat tour in Hawaiʻi have filed a lawsuit.

David Berkowitz / Flickr

Brian Schatz on Midterms; Hotel Strike Update; Lava Recovery; Rapa Nui Exhibit

Ben Gaddis / U.S. Geological Survey

Itʻs been six months since lava erupted in the residential community of Leilani Estates on the Big Island. HPR Reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi returned to Puna to check-in on recovery efforts. 

U.S. Geological Survey

The eruption of Kīlauea earlier this year destroyed or damaged hundreds of homes. Lava also swept through more than a thousand acres of farmland. 

Wikipedia

Scientists on board the research vessel, the Nautilus, sought refuge from tropical storm Olivia in South Point on the Big Island. Catherine Cruz spoke with Geologist Chris German with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute about the unexpected opportunity to collect data on the newly formed lava delta during a lull of the volcano.

United States Department of Defense

Despite some glowing heat from fissure 8, the Kīlauea lava flow has slowed down, at least for the time being.  But the destruction and displacement from the flow into lower Puna which began May 3rd is still being addressed by county, state and federal agencies.  We get an update on the federal response from HPR Contributing Reporter Sherry Bracken.



Wikipedia

Volcano Update, Storms and Shipping; Maui Homeless Strategy; Native Hawaiian Health

Harrison Patino

Earlier in the week, a young woman who was severely injured by a lava bomb spoke to the media for the first time. 20-year-old Jessica Tilton and her family were visiting Hawaii from Illinois. The Tilton’s booked a lava viewing boat tour out of Hilo on July 16th.

U.S. Geological Survey

The eruption at Kilauea has been disrupting life in Puna for almost 3 months. At present, over 700 homes have been destroyed. Many more have been abandoned due to unsafe conditions and lack of access.

Some residents have been receiving payouts from their homeowners insurance to cover the damage. But others are not so lucky. One Big Island couple is suing their insurer over the company's lack of response.

U.S. Geological Survey

The lava flow on Hawai'i Island continues to touch residents around the island. In the lower Puna District, many concerns center on air quality and property damage. But there's another area that's seeing an impact: real estate prices.

U.S. Geological Survey

One of the many impacts of the ongoing lava eruption on the Big Island is on the supply of electricity. There is less power, but the Hawaiian Electric Light Company has also lost customers. So far, there’s been no obvious impact to remaining consumers — at least in terms of turning on their lights.

Housing Challenges for Displaced Puna Residents

Jun 26, 2018
Brandee Menino

It’s an effort relief workers describe as overwhelming; the displacement of hundreds of families in the wake of the Kilauea disaster. The destruction of over 500 is adding a new population to the already growing numbers of homeless on Hawaii Island. 

The Conversation: Tuesday, June 26th, 2018

Jun 26, 2018
Brandee Menino

Temporary Housing for Displaced Big Island Residents; Rising Tensions over Noise Pollution; Uncertain Future of Internet in Hawaii; Ohina Short Film Festival

U.S. Geological Survey

The eruption at Kīlauea continues to send ash plumes into the sky and push lava into the ocean. While that has destroyed hundreds of homes and forced scores of people into shelters, it is also providing an unprecedented opportunity for scientific research.

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