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2 Arrested After Flag Burning Near White House

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Alex Brandon/AP
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The U.S. Secret Service says two people were arrested during a Fourth of July flag-burning incident on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

The arrests were made about two hours before President Donald Trump paid tribute to the U.S. military during a speech at the Lincoln Memorial. The Secret Service says one person was arrested for felony assault on a police officer and malicious burning. The other was arrested for hindering a police investigation and resisting arrest. Neither individual was identified.

It is not illegal to burn a U.S. flag, but the Secret Service says the burning occurred beyond the limits of a permit issued by the National Park Service.

Two uniformed Secret Service officers suffered minor injuries while attempting to make the arrests.

The president stuck with a patriotic message during his Fourth of July "Salute to America" speech, steering clear of the political rhetoric many had expected.

Trump hailed an eclectic mix of history's heroes, from the armed forces, space, civil rights and other endeavors of American life. He largely adhered to his script, avoiding diversions into his agenda or re-election campaign.

Trump said "our nation is stronger than it ever was before" and "for Americans, nothing is impossible." He gave a list of American accomplishments over its history, including the moon landing 50 years ago. "Very soon, we will plant the American flag on Mars," he said.

Attendees were treated to flyovers by Coast Guard helicopters, Air Force F-22 fighters, Marine V-22 Osprey helicopters and other military aircraft.

The event ended with a flyover by the Navy's Blue Angels aerobatics team.

Trump was the first president in nearly seven decades to address a crowd at the National Mall on Independence Day.

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