malaysia rhino

Borneo Rhino Alliance

One of the rarest creatures on Earth has died. The last Sumatran rhino in Malaysia, Iman, passed away Saturday at the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary in Sabah, Malaysia, due to complications with inoperable tumors. 

The Sumatran rhino once inhabited a wide area in southeast Asia, but today is one of the world’s most critically endangered animals, with fewer than 80 thought to still remain in Indonesia, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Borneo Rhino Alliance

In the last few weeks in Malaysia, scientists desperately tried to repeat the success of a recent in vitro fertilization effort to save the northern white rhino, but in this case, with the Sumatran rhino, according to the Borneo Rhino Alliance.

Borneo Rhino Alliance

    

courtesy John Payne / Borneo Rhino Alliance

     

In the Asia Pacific, the news continues to be grim on the island of Borneo, where experts from one country’s wildlife department are desperately trying to save the life of an extraordinarily rare, critically endangered animal – one of only nine in captivity anywhere in the world; we’ve followed her story for weeks and have an update.

Screenshot of Borneo Rhino Alliance video on Youtube

Today on All Things Considered we have an update to an Asia Pacific story we’ve followed for several weeks about one of the rarest animals on earth: the Sumatran rhino, a species that dates back millions of years, with just nine in captivity, and a few dozen hoped to exist in the wild. Since mid-December, one of only two Sumatran rhinos left in Malaysia has made news as she faces a health crisis, and while there had been some signs of hope in the run-up to Christmas, the news became eerily quiet, until today.