Howard's Day Off - September 10 2016

Sep 10, 2016

---FIRST HALF HOUR---

:04—Ignace Pleyel (1757-1831): Symphony in C major, finale, 1778, Uwe Grodd, Capella Istropolitana [ Naxos 554696]. Written when Pleyel was 21 and had just completed five years of study with Haydn. Later he became a music publisher.

:11—Virgil Thomson (1896-1989): Symphony No. 2 in C major, 1941, first move., “allegro militaire,” James Sedares, New Zealand Symphony [Naxos 559022].

:15—Zoltan Kodaly (1882-1967): “Viennese Musical Clock,” from “Hary Janos,” 1926, Neeme Jarvi, Chicago Symphony [Chandos 8877].

:18—Francis Poulenc (1899-1963): Trio for Oboe, Bassoon and Piano, finale, 1926, Hansjorg Schellenberger, oboe; Milan Turkovic, bassoon; James Levine, piano [DG 427 639].

:22—Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971): Suite No. 2 for Small Orchestra, finale, galop, 1921, Pierre Boulez, New York Philharmonic [SMK 45843].

:24—David Diamond (1915-2005): Rounds for String Orchestra, first move., 1940,  Gerard Schwarz, Seattle Symphony [Delos 3189].

---SECOND HALF HOUR---

:30—Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Fugue No. 11 in F major, from “The Well-Tempered Clavier,” Book I, Glenn Gould, piano [M3K 42266].

:32—Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904): String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op.96, “American,” finale, Vlach Quartet of Prague [Naxos 553371].

:38—Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Prelude and Fugue No. 15 in G major, from “The Well-Tempered Clavier,” Book I, Glenn Gould, piano [M3K 42266].

:41—Joseph Haydn (1712-1809): Symphony No. 88, finale, 1787, Adam Fischer, Austro-Hungarian Haydn Orchestra [Nimbus 5417]. Maybe the sunniest finale he ever wrote.

:45—Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791): Symphony No. 41, “Jupiter,” finale, 1788, Rafael Kubelik, Bavarian Radio Symphony [MK 36703]. Both these finales are in the bright key of G major.

:52—Joaquin Rodrigo (1901-1999): Fandango, from “Soleriana,” Suite for Orchestra, based on music of Antonio Soler, Maximiano Valdes, Asturias Symphony [Naxos 555844].

---THIRD HALF HOUR---

:04—Aaron Copland (1900-1990): “Sunday Traffic,” from “The City,” Jonathan Sheffer, Eos Orchestra [Telarc 80583].

:07—Malcolm Arnold (1921-2006): Sinfonietta, first move., 1954, Donald Barra, San Diego Chamber Orchestra [Koch 7134].

:12—Randall Thompson (1899-1984): Symphony No. 3, finale, 1949, Andrew Schenck, New Zealand Symphony [Koch 7413].

:18—Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971): “Pulcinella,” seventh move., 1920, Pierre Boulez, New York Philharmonic [SMK 45843]. This is the piece with the boisterous trombone solo.

:20—Virgil Thomson (1896-1989): Symphony on a Hymn Tune, 1928, third move.,  James Sedares, New Zealand Symphony [Naxos 559022].

:24—Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Fugue No. 19 in A major, from “The Well-Tempered Clavier,” Book I, Glenn Gould, piano [M3K 42266].

:27—Jacques Ibert (1890-1962): Prelude to “Elizabethan Suite,” 1942, Richard Auldon Clark, Manhattan Chamber Orchestra [Newport Classic 85531].

---FOURTH HALF HOUR---

:30—Germaine Tailleferre (1892-1983): Pastorale, Emily Beyron, flute’ Andrew West, piano [Hyperion 67204].

:34—Claude Debussy (1862-1918): “Le petit negre,” William Bennett Wind Quartet [Cala 1017].

:36—Francis Poulenc (1899-1963): Flute Sonata, finale, 1957, Wolfgang Schulz, flute; James Levine, piano [DG 427 639].

:40—Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847): “Scottish Symphony,” second move., Georg Solti, Chicago Symphony [London 414 665].

(TRICK QUESTION: IS THIS GENIAL MUSIC?)

:45—Charles Gounod: “Funeral March of the Marionettes,” The Mighty Tubadours [Crystal 420]. Technically a funeral march, but one for marionettes, which undermines any funereal feeling, plus, it’s played on tubas.

:47—Aaron Copland (1900-1990): “March of the Americas,” from “Sorcery to Science,” Jonathan Sheffer, Eos Orchestra [Telarc 80583]. Written for the 1939 New York World’s Fair.

:49—Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990): “Enter Three Sailors,” from “Fancy Free,”  Leonard Bernstein, New York Philharmonic [SMK 63085].

:52—Darius Milhaud (1892-1974): Polka from “L’Eventail de Jeanne,” Geoffrey Simon, Philharmonia Orchestra [Chandos 8356].

:55—Bill Finegan (1917-2008) -Eddie Sauter (1914-1981): “Doodletown Fifers,” Sauter-Finegan Orchestra [CCM 078]. Classical trained arrangers for more famous big bands, Sauter and Finegan collaborated for a studio album that became so popular they wound up touring.