wwII

AP Photo/Caleb Jones

A crew of deep-sea explorers and historians looking for lost World War II warships have found a second Japanese aircraft carrier that went down in the historic Battle of Midway.

Vulcan Inc. via AP

Deep-sea explorers scouring the world's oceans for sunken World War II ships are focusing in on debris fields deep in the Pacific, in an area where one of the most decisive battles of the time took place.

U.S. Navy

While all eyes focus on the coast of France on this 75th Anniversary of D-Day, we sometimes overlook events on the other side of the world. That same day, June 6, 1944, a huge attack force cleared Pearl Harbor on its way to invade Japanese positions in the Mariana Islands.

Wikimedia Commons

A new book out in Australia reports that 22 Australian nurses were raped by Japanese troops before they were machine gunned in February, 1942. The book also says that Australian officials gagged the sole survivor of the massacre.

U.S. Navy

The wreck of USS Hornet has been found in the Solomon Islands. A research vessel funded by the late billionaire Paul Allen located the famous ship under 17, 500 feet of water at the bottom of the South Pacific. 

U.S. Air Force / National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

76 years ago today, 16 B-25 bombers took off from the aircraft carrier Hornet to attack Tokyo and other Japanese cities. The famous Doolittle Raid lifted American morale in the early days of the Second World War, and while it inflicted very little damage, there were unexpected consequences. We have more from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute.

Luke Brindley / Wikimedia Commons

Papua New Guinea’s Kokoda Track is open again, after local landowners ended a protest that closed the famous trail for three weeks. According to RNZ Pacific, the government agreed to review the joint aid program with Australia, which manages the track. We have more from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

This day, December 7th, began with Japanese bombs and flames at Pearl Harbor in 1941, it was a pivotal event that prompted America’s entry into WWII.  Today, seventy six years later, people commemorate the fateful day in various ways.  As part of er series on local craft brewing, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa takes us to a small pub, the Brewseum, in Kaka‘ako where people sip home brews and marvel at unique WWII memorabilia.

Evelina Galang
Evelina Galang

Award winning writer and educator, M. Evelina Galang, runs into a lot of people who don’t realize that Koreans were not the only WWII “comfort women.”  “Comfort women” is the euphemism for girls and women abducted and raped by Japanese soldiers across the so-called co-prosperity sphere, including Korea through China and the Philippines.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Galang’s new book, Lolas' House, which opens a window onto the Filipina experience.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

“Go for Broke” was the motto of the 442 Regimental Combat Team.  It was a spirit that changed the minds of Americans as they watched ethnic Japanese fight and die for the United States, even while their relatives were stripped of possessions and thrown into camps.  Over forty years later, President Reagan signed legislation that admitted "race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership" caused the internment.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the legacy we all share from this experience.

NPS Archive
NPS Archive

This week we’ve been marking the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, in part by hearing the voices of many who lived through that day and the weeks and years that followed.

For residents of Hawai‘i, the attack marked a turning point.  Life changed in many ways—including the way people went about their daily activities.  Our Morning Edition host Derrick Mālama heard some details about that from his mother, Annie Shirabe Mālama.

U.S. National Archives
U.S. National Archives

The bombing of Pearl Harbor was a turning point for Hawai‘i, but it was also the culmination of decades of militarization on O‘ahu.  At the same time, ethnic Japanese constituted forty percent of Hawai‘i’s population, a fact not lost on Washington, as Japanese armies spread across China and the Pacific.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands vows that a new battlefield memorial will be completed on Guadalcanal in time for ceremonies on the 75th Anniversary of the battle.  US Marines waded ashore on Red Beach on August 6th, 1942, beginning a six month struggle that marked a turning point of the Second World War in the Pacific.  We have more from Neal Conan, in the Pacific News Minute.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Once thought to be lost, the Honouliuli Internment Camp is now a national monument. Yesterday, a dedication ceremony in the Kunia gulch made it official. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell joined local leaders and several volunteers from the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, who have been working for years to preserve what was once the largest internment camp in the state.

68 years ago today Japan gave its unconditional surrender…bringing the second world war to a close. Today, the Pacific is peaceful…but regional tensions remain. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.