Wall Street

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

NEW YORK (AP) — The S&P 500 rose to a record high Friday as investors continue to look forward to the distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine and relief for the global economy.

Monica Volpin from Pixabay

The Dow Jones Industrial Average traded above 30,000 points for the first time Tuesday as investors were encouraged by the latest progress on developing coronavirus vaccines and news that the transition of power in the U.S. to President-elect Joe Biden will finally begin.

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

Stocks closed broadly lower on Wall Street Friday following another choppy day of trading as worries about the worsening pandemic undercut growing optimism about a coming coronavirus vaccine.

AP Photo/John Minchillo

Stocks around the world are tumbling Wednesday on worries the worsening pandemic will mean more restrictions on businesses and drag down the economy.

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

U.S. stocks fell sharply Monday, deepening last week's losses, as a troubling increase in coronavirus counts put investors in a selling mood. The skid came as doubts mount on Wall Street that Washington will come through with more stimulus for the economy before Election Day.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

TOKYO — Asian shares fell moderately Tuesday, tracking Wall Street's overnight decline as hopes faded Washington will come through with badly needed aid for the U.S. economy before the U.S. presidential election.

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

NEW YORK — Americans who own stocks are pulling further away from those who don’t, as Wall Street roars back to record heights while much of the economy struggles. And Black households are much more likely to be in that not-as-fortunate group that isn’t in the stock market.

Hawaii Adjutant General Kenneth Hara; Economist Paul Brewbaker; Reality Check: HPD Crime-Solving at Record Low; ESG Metrics

AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko

Wall Street managed to end a bumpy day broadly higher Friday but still finished with its worst week in nearly three months.

New York Stock Exchange via AP Images

Updated: 6/11/2020, 10:52 a.m.

Stocks fell sharply on Wall Street Thursday as coronavirus cases in the U.S. increased again, deflating recent optimism that the economy could recover quickly from its worst crisis in decades.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Updated 3/16/20, 10:45 a.m.

NEW YORK — The U.S. stock market plunged 12% Monday for its worst day in more than three decades as voices from Wall Street to the White House said the coronavirus is likely dragging the economy into a recession.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Updated 3/12/20, 11:25 a.m.

NEW YORK — The escalating coronavirus emergency sent the stock market Thursday into its worst slide since the Black Monday crash of 1987, extending a sell-off that has now wiped out most of Wall Street's big gains since President Donald Trump took office.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve moved Thursday to try to ease disruptions in the financial markets stemming from the coronavirus by announcing that it will sharply increase its purchases of short-term Treasury bonds.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Updated 3/10/20, 11:40 a.m.

NEW YORK — Stocks on Tuesday recouped most of their historic losses from the prior day as hopes rose, faded and then bloomed again on Wall Street that the U.S. government will try to cushion the economic pain from the coronavirus.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Updated 3/5/20, 11:27 a.m.

NEW YORK — Fear dominated financial markets again on Thursday, and stocks fell sharply on worries about the fast-spreading virus outbreak. It's the latest shudder in Wall Street's wildest week in more than eight years.

AhmadArdity / Pixabay

Stocks fell sharply again on Wall Street Tuesday, piling on losses a day after the market's biggest drop in two years as fears spread that the growing virus outbreak will put the brakes on the global economy.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

The Dow Jones Industrial Average slumped more than 1,000 points Monday in the worst day for the stock market in two years as investors worry that the spread of a viral outbreak that began in China will weaken global economic growth.

Jacquelyn Martin/AP

WASHINGTON — A federal agency is moving with little fanfare to revamp one of the most successful whistleblower programs in the government, alarming advocates who warn the changes will set back efforts to police Wall Street and punish corporate fraud.