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Matti Blume / Wikimedia Commons

There’s a trans-Pacific trade controversy that’s been building for years between the United States and one of its leading trade partners. This one has nothing to do with China, but it does affect a major American company — and shows that international trade rules don’t always keep up with market conditions.

Shealah Craighead
The White House / Flickr

President Trump covered a lot of ground in his State of the Union address this week — including trade issues with China. A U.S. delegation is heading to China next week for another round of talks, but a tariff deadline is fast approaching.

Senior Airman Dana Hill / U.S. Air Force

During his State of the Union address last night, President Trump announced he’ll be meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Vietnam at the end of the month. In another regional development, the United States and South Korea have apparently reached a deal on financing U.S. troops on the Korean peninsula.

Official U.S. Navy Page / Flickr

You may have heard on the news that the United States filed charges yesterday against the Chinese telecommunications company Huawei and its Chief Financial Officer. Tomorrow, the two countries start high stakes negotiations on the on-going trade war. And both the U.S. and China continue military displays in the Western Pacific.

Craig Nagy / Flickr

A Chinese trade delegation is heading to Washington this week for two days of meetings with U.S. officials. The discussions take place as a series of American companies are reporting that slower growth in China’s economy is hurting their profits—and that impact is also being felt in the Asia Pacific.

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton / U.S. Air Force

A C-130 named after General Douglas MacArthur carried a part of the Philippines’ history home this week. The United States returned three bells seized as war booty in 1901 in a ceremony broadcast live on Philippine television.

The White House / Flickr

The Group of Twenty meeting in Argentina wrapped up this weekend — generating a number of headlines. But there were also some smaller stories that may be significant in the long term. And that includes an unusual bit of diplomacy involving three countries.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

When the APEC Summit failed to agree on what’s usually a routine final statement over the weekend, much of the blame was leveled at differences between the United States and China on trade. But the two great powers were competing on many levels.

Shealah Craighead / The White House

The politics of trade remain a top priority for the Trump Administration, and that is having an impact on the rest of the Asia Pacific. Vice President Mike Pence represented the United States at the recent APEC meetings, which in many ways set the stage for another international gathering later this month.

Steven Byles / Flickr

Congress won’t be back in session until after Election Day. But before leaving Washington, lawmakers allowed an action to go ahead that’s likely to raise some objections in China.

Michael Day / Flickr

The United States and North Korea are quietly continuing talks about denuclearization. But South Korea’s government is moving faster toward cooperation on some projects with the North. And that’s drawing a reaction from the United States.

Leonidl / Wikimedia Commons

The United States is facing a diplomatic complication this week with one of its allies in the Asia Pacific. It follows a top-level meeting on Friday — and the outcome remains uncertain.

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The continuing trade dispute between the United States and China is starting to hit a variety of products.  Last week, the Trump Administration slapped ten-percent tariffs on another 200-billion dollars of Chinese imports. One area that’s feeling the pinch: seafood.

Buonasera / Wikimedia Commons

The issue of trade remains a topic for the Trump Administration with several countries, especially China. And a leading regional financial institution says that ongoing dispute will soon begin to have a wider impact.

Rytut / Wikipedia

President Trump is in Europe this week, but on the policy front it’s been another week of trade talk about China. His administration has listed another 200-billion dollars of Chinese goods that could be subject to tariffs. So far, most of this dispute has not directly touched Hawaii—but that could change.

Senior Airman Dana Hill / U.S. Air Force

Government officials from the United States and South Korea are still trying to figure out the details of President Trump’s promise to pull back from military exercises on the Korean peninsula. The development surprised military officials in both Washington and Seoul.

Goodtiming8871 / Wikimedia Commons

We’re just a few days away from President Trump’s scheduled meeting with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un in Singapore. And while global attention has been focused on these two leaders, several others will be affected by whatever takes place in Singapore.

sasint / Pixabay

A new report out this week says flooding related to climate change will cost China nearly 400-billion dollars over the next twenty years. But there will also be high costs to the United States — and not just because of the weather. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikimedia Commons

It’s official: President Trump will meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in about four and a half weeks, on June 12th. The meeting will be held in Singapore. But why that location? HPR’s Bill Dorman has some thoughts in today’s Asia Minute.

Buonasera / Wikimedia Commons

Several top officials in the Trump Administration will be heading to China next week to talk about trade. The group will be led by Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and will include the head of the National Economic Council, Larry Kudlow, as well as the U.S. Trade Representative. While no breakthroughs are expected, some of the challenges are clear. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia

President Trump is considering re-engaging with what was once called the Trans Pacific Partnership. But that process may not be a simple one. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

USDA photo by Lance Cheung

As trade tensions between the U.S. and China continue to simmer, the Trump Administration has authorized American defense contractors to help Taiwan construct a fleet of submarines. Following the announcement, Chinese officials warned the U.S. not to play the “Taiwan Card”. We have more from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute

hashi photo / CC BY 3.0 / Wikimedia Commons

The United States and China are continuing their trade dispute by exchanging threats and specifics on tariffs. China says it will raise tariffs on a variety of U.S. products, including pork. The Trump Administration is expected to release further details on its plans later this week. But so far one export has not been mentioned—and it doesn’t fit on a container ship. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Official U.S. Navy Page / Flickr

Over the past few days, fears of a trade war with China have calmed on news of negotiations between Washington and Beijing, but U.S. diplomatic and military missions over the past two weeks have drawn angry reactions from China. We have more from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute.

HeungSoon / Pixabay

President Trump’s recent talk about trade tariffs has focused on China. But another trade dispute looks like it will take a toll on a country very important to Hawaii. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Gobierno de Chile / Flickr

When it comes to news about trade, most of the focus this week has been on President Trump’s plan to impose tariffs on imported steel and aluminum. Elsewhere, a number of other countries signed a multi-lateral trade deal that will actually REDUCE tariffs in the Asia Pacific. But the United States is not part of it. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

kwluth / Pixabay

While President Trump’s tough talk on tariffs hits a nerve in China, Congress hit an even more sensitive area last week; when both houses unanimously approved the Taiwan Travel Act. We have details from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute.

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Daniel Hinton / United State Forces Korea

Government officials from the United States and South Korea will be meeting in Hawai‘i this week. They’ll be talking about cost-sharing when it comes to U.S. military forces based in South Korea. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jarod Hodge / U.S. Navy

On Sunday, the Chinese Communist Party announced that presidents will no longer be limited to two terms, clearing the way for Xi Jinping to remain in office for the foreseeable future. The news comes as the U.S. and its Indo-Pacific allies reconsider an old idea – an informal alliance called the "Quad."  We have more from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute.

East Asia and Pacific Media Hub U.S. Department of State / Wikimedia Commons

International negotiators have released the final version of a massive trade deal that does not include the United States. The agreement is on track to be signed in two weeks, and it’s getting renewed attention from some lawmakers in Washington. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

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