tourism

Lawrence Murray / CC BY 2.0 / Flickr

Hawaii is not the only set of islands dealing with changing expectations for the tourism industry. This week, New Zealand has recalibrated its goals for visitors, and their impact on the economy and the environment.

Janice Wei / National Park Service

Today on Bytemarks Café, Burt will talk to Shaka Guide, a local startup that produces trips and guides around Hawaiʻi. Also, a discussion about out how they've grown to incorporate new technologies as well as expand to new markets, beyond Hawaiʻi. 6:30 PM on HPR-1.

Edmund Garman / CC BY 2.0 / Flickr

The visitor industry remains one of Hawaii’s key economic engines, but what about the future? One need is to continue to develop a tourism workforce, and that was a goal of a program this month involving more than a thousand high school students on four islands.

Cristo Vlahos / CC BY-SA 3.0 / Wikimedia Commons

Ten million visitors a year may be a goal for some, but it’s an overwhelming number for others. Hotel executive and tourism marketing experts sat down with Pacific Business News to talk about their current challenges and opportunities.

ken lund / flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Hawaiʻiʻs economy grew at a slower pace than the average for the country in the first three quarters of last year and is projected to be unchanged for the fourth quarter. Meanwhile, signs point to slower growth for the state over the next several years.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

Hawaiʻi visitors can now buy medical marijuana while on vacation in the islands. The state Health Department announced it is offering temporary cannabis cards to qualified out-of-state patients. 

Hawaii Tourism Authority

Statewide hotel occupancy dropped to its lowest January level in four years, as every major island began the year with fewer occupied hotel rooms. According to a report from the data and analytics firm STR, statewide occupancy dropped 3.4% to 79.5% when compared to January 2018.

Hawaii Tourism Authority

Long-time hotel executive Christopher Tatum is the new head of the Hawaii Tourism Authority. He’s got some plans for a new direction.

Daniel Case / Wikimedia Commons

Visitor spending in Hawai‘i increased nearly 7-percent last year. It grew even faster in China, but that was the slowest growth in a decade. And when it comes to Chinese headed overseas, the figures tell a different story.

RGB256 / Wikimedia Commons

Many countries tax tourists when they leave. The United States has done it for years — including international visitors leaving Hawaii. But in one Asian country, this is the first week for that practice.

Joshua Damasio / Flickr

Visitor spending in Hawaii so far this year is running about 9-percent ahead of last year’s pace. But tourism is growing even faster in one of the main sources of Hawaii’s visitors: Japan.

George / Wikimedia Commons

Vivid images of volcanic eruptions captured the world’s attention this year, but frightened off visitors. 

Joannerfabregas / Wikimedia Commons

An experiment in tourism continues this week in the Philippines. The government closed one of its most popular beaches for six months to clean up the area and reduce the capacity for visitors. Now the beach is open again, but not everything is going as planned. 

Joshua Damasio / Flickr

It’s still too early to determine what impacts the Marriott hotel strike may have on tourism in Hawai‘i. That may be one challenge for the new leader of the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority, expected to be named soon. On the other side of the Pacific, there’s a different sort of challenge for tourism.

YunHo LEE / Flickr

Visitor spending and arrivals are up across the islands compared to a year ago. That includes visitors from most markets in the Asia Pacific. And residents in one of those countries are setting records for foreign travel.

Cristo Vlahos / CC BY-SA 3.0 / Wikimedia Commons

August was another month of growth for the state’s tourism industry, but only slightly.

Philippe Teuwen / Flickr

We’re a week away from the Hawaii Tourism Authority’s annual Global Tourism Summit. While the state will update its latest strategies to attract visitors, other locations are considering similar plans. And that includes the capital of South Korea.

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Soo C. Kim/Released)

Hawaii’s tourism industry is on track for another year of growth. Last week, the Hawaii Tourism Authority reported increased spending and visitor arrivals on every island except the Big Island. The figures are even more dramatic for another location that is expecting continued growth in tourism: Japan.

Roderick Eime / Flickr

The government of New Zealand is looking at a proposal to tax its tourists. The measure would tack on an arrival charge for most international visitors, but the proceeds would go beyond well marketing.

Wikimedia Commons

A new economic report from the University of Hawai‘i’s Economic Research Organization takes a county-by-county look at what is shaping up to be a strong 2018.. Pacific Business News editor in chief A. Kam Napier has more.

www.travelanddestinations.com / Wikimedia Commons

Hawaii’s visitor industry reported another strong month in April, although any impact of the Kilauea Volcano won’t show up until the May figures come out next month. While authorities continue to encourage visitors to Hawaii, there’s another location in the Asia Pacific that is taking a different approach. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia

Tourism remains one of Hawai‘i’s economic pillars. And while 2017 was another year of records, the industry faces some new challenges this year. PBN editor in chief A. Kam Napier has more from a roundtable of tourism industry executives.

Hashi photo / Wikimedia Commons

2017 was another record year for tourism in Hawai‘i for the sixth year in a row. But another Pacific island destination had an even bigger year last year—thanks in part to Hawai‘i. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

Professional soccer is once again trying to find a foothold in Hawai‘i. Organizers of this week’s Pacific Rim Cup hope to make Hawai’i the international east-meets-west sporting venue. HPR’s Ku’uwehi Hiraishi reports.

Malaysia Tourism

Tourism is not only the center of Hawai‘i’s economy, it’s a growing part of the global economy. And while countries are figuring out the best ways to market themselves to visitors, one Asian country is coming under criticism for its latest efforts. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

MassimoAbad / Pixabay
MassimoAbad / Pixabay

The final numbers aren’t in yet, but tourism officials expect 2017 to be another record year for visitors to Hawai‘i. That would make it the sixth straight year for record growth. That closely matches another Pacific location that also continues to set tourism records. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Luke Ma / Wikimedia Commons
Luke Ma / Wikimedia Commons

Japanese visitors have played an important role in driving Hawaii’s tourism numbers to new records. But since North Korea made threats about Guam this summer, Japanese travel to that Pacific island has dropped. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikimedia Commons

The final numbers are not in yet, but expectations are that 2017 will turn out to be another record year for tourism in Hawai‘i. Conversations are continuing about balancing tourism growth with protection of natural resources around the state. But elsewhere in the Pacific, an island that likes to compare itself to Hawai‘i is making some changes. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Last month, China told its tourist agencies to stop all flights to the Pacific island nation of Palau, in what’s believed to be a protest over a recent visit by the President of Taiwan. Chinese tourists made up more than half of Palau’s tourists last year, but, as we hear from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute, Palau doesn’t seem worried.

Sustainable Coastlines Hawai'i

Most tourists come to Hawaiʻi on vacation for rest and relaxation, but there’s a popular trend in visitors coming to Hawaiʻi to volunteer their time and labor. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi steps into the world of volunteer tourism or “voluntourism.”

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