Tiananmen Square

AP Photo/Jeff Widener

Today marks the 30th anniversary of Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. Much of the coverage centers on memories of that bloody night, and how its impact is still felt today. Another part of the story is the international media itself, and why so many of them were in Beijing at that time.

Sadayuki Mikami/AP

BEIJING — Thirty years since the Tiananmen Square protests, China's economy has catapulted up the world rankings, yet political repression is harsher than ever.

Courtesy Jeff Widener
Courtesy Jeff Widener

28 years ago, the city of Beijing was in chaos. Two nights earlier, Chinese authorities had cleared Tiananmen Square. On June 5, 1989, news outlets around the world showed an Associated Press photo showing someone who has come to be known as “Tank Man.”  The photographer who took that photo was on Hawai'i Island recently working on his new book about the parts of Hawaii tourists often do not seeand talked with HPR contributing reporter Sherry Bracken about what it took to get the shot.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

  Today is the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre. Chinese troops and tanks cleared out demonstrators…killing an unknown number of people. Within all the coverage of the anniversary, one question sometimes gets overlooked. Why was the foreign media there in the first place? HPR’s Bill Dorman has some answers in today’s Asia Minute.