stock market

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Updated 3/10/20, 11:40 a.m.

NEW YORK — Stocks on Tuesday recouped most of their historic losses from the prior day as hopes rose, faded and then bloomed again on Wall Street that the U.S. government will try to cushion the economic pain from the coronavirus.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

NEW YORK  — Bond yields fell to more record lows as investors continue to demand safety and unload stocks. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note sank as low as 0.66% as investors worried that economic damage from the spreading virus outbreak will be worse than previously thought.

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The Dow Jones Industrial Average soared more than 1,100 points, or 4.5%, Wednesday on hopes that governments and central banks around the world will take more forceful measures to fight the virus outbreak.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Stocks sank again Friday after another wild day on Wall Street, extending a rout that handed the market its worst week since October 2008 at the height of the financial crisis.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

Stocks took another steep dive Friday, deepening a multi-day rout fueled by fears about the coronavirus' impact on the global economy.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 357 points on Friday, capping a week in which the blue chip index fell 3,583 points or 12.4%. The Dow is down 16.3% from its recent peak on Feb. 12.

The S&P 500 stock index lost 11.5% for the week and is now down 14.6% from the all-time high it reached only last week.

AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Major U.S. stock indexes gave up early gains and closed mostly lower Wednesday, extending the market’s heavy losses for the week.

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Stocks fell sharply again on Wall Street Tuesday, piling on losses a day after the market's biggest drop in two years as fears spread that the growing virus outbreak will put the brakes on the global economy.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

The Dow Jones Industrial Average slumped more than 1,000 points Monday in the worst day for the stock market in two years as investors worry that the spread of a viral outbreak that began in China will weaken global economic growth.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

The Dow Jones Industrial Average slumped more than 600 points Friday as a virus outbreak that originated in China continued to widen, stoking stock investors' worries about the potential global economic fallout.

Kin Cheung/AP

NEW YORK — Stocks around the world fell last week on worries that a new type of virus in China may ultimately hit profits for companies from Wuhan to Washington. The World Health Organization has held off on calling the outbreak a global health emergency but says it may become one.

AhmadArdity / Pixabay

Investors begin the New Year following a very strong stock market in 2019. For the year, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 22%, while the broader S&P 500 rose 29%. For investors in Hawaii’s biggest publicly-held companies, returns have been positive this year—but in many cases, not as high as the overall market.   

Richard Drew/AP

If the threat of a recession gives you pause when it comes to your personal finances, remember now is a time to prepare, not panic.

AhmadArdity / Pixabay

These are volatile times for China’s stock market. The first trading day of the week saw the biggest gains for the Shanghai Composite Index in more than two and a half years. On Tuesday, the market plunged. And over the past year, the market is still one of the worst performers in the world.

Allan Ajifo / Wikimedia Commons

It’s been a volatile week for global stock markets. That’s also true in the Asia Pacific. Today markets are up again—but in the early part of the week, some markets were hit harder than others—despite what remains an encouraging economic outlook. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

S. / Flickr
S. / Flickr

The US presidential election has not only dominated the US news cycle for weeks, it’s also been a focus overseas. HPR’s Bill Dorman looks at early media reaction from the Asia Pacific in today’s Asia Minute.

Shock, disbelief and uncertainty.  And that was just the reaction of financial markets in the Asia Pacific.  As Donald Trump pushed closer to the White House, regional stock indices tumbled.  Markets around Asia closed before the election was settled—with Japan taking the biggest hit.

The Nikkei sank more than five and a third percent—to a three-month low.

Holly Golabek / Flickr
Holly Golabek / Flickr

It’s been another volatile week on global stock markets. Stock prices have rallied around the world today, although they’re still down since the start of the year.  And the declines have been even steeper in several Asia Pacific markets—but not all of them. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

tonynetone/ Flickr
tonynetone/ Flickr

Three trading days into the New Year, financial markets around the world remain uncertain. And a lot of that nervousness begins with China. Part of it relates to the economy, but it’s also uncertainty about what the government will do when it comes to the stock market. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Transparency has never been a particular strength of China’s stock market.  Investors at home and abroad know the government plays a role in the market, but the extent is a moving target and not always clear.  This week is a good example.

Christopher / Flickr
Christopher / Flickr

China’s stock market began the week with its biggest single-day plunge in more than eight years.  Overnight, that selling continued. But what’s the story behind those falling numbers? HPR’s Bill Dorman has some context in today’s Asia Minute.

Perpetual Tourist / Flickr
Perpetual Tourist / Flickr

There aren’t many publicly traded companies headquartered in Hawaii – just 16, since Maui-based Code Rebel recently went public. Overall, how are they performing? Pacific Business News Editor in Chief A. Kam Napier has more.

As recently as the 1990s, stockbroker Randy Havre offered a Hawaii fund, that is a portfolio of stocks, through which people could invest in all of Hawaii’s publicly traded companies. He no longer offers that fund. Due to mergers and acquisitions, the number of companies has shrunk to just 16.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

It’s been another good year for the stock market. The S&P 500 is up 13% over the past 12 months. For local companies that are publicly held, it’s been a mixed story. HPR’s Bill Dorman has an update on how several local companies have done this year.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

  

One Christmas present of sorts that came early for consumers in Hawaii and across the country: cheaper gas prices. That fall in fuel prices has also made a difference for a number of publicly-held companies based in Hawaii. HPR’s Bill Dorman takes a look at some of the more active local stocks of 2014.

Asia Markets: 2013

Jan 2, 2014
Wikipedia
Wikipedia

 

  For international investors, 2013 was a year of some market surprises across Asia. The strongest regional stock market was in Japan, while the weakest was in China. Other markets turned in a mixed performance. HPR’s Bill Dorman reviews the results in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / Dick Thomas Johnson
Flickr / Dick Thomas Johnson

It’s been a volatile week for the world’s financial markets. That’s especially true in Asia—and in the country that’s the most important to Hawaii’s visitor industry: Japan. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.