shark

Nnachappa64/Wikimedia Commons / CC License 4.0

Updated: Aug. 20, 4:31 p.m.

Hawaii police say a woman bitten twice by a shark while swimming in Kealakekua Bay is expected to be released from a hospital.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Sharks have long held an important place in Hawaiian history and culture. To many they are protectors, family guardians or “amakua.” Now researchers in Australia are using lessons from sharks to fight disease. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

The Conversation: Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

May 25, 2016
Carl Meyer

Proposed Moratorium on Fishing in North Kona; Na Hōkū Nominee Joni Llamedo; Shark Behavior in Maui; Competitive High School Equestrian

Proposed Ka’upulehu Marine Reserve: Aunty Hannah Springer

DLNR
DLNR

Scientists are getting a better idea of how sharks behave and why so many attacks have occurred off Maui. The study, commissioned by the state’s Department of Land and Natural Resources monitored more than 40 tagged sharks in waters off Maui and Oahu. HPR’s Molly Solomon shares their findings.

Carl Meyer is used to getting up close and personal with one of Hawai‘i’s apex predators. He’s spent the past two years tagging tiger sharks in Hawai‘i to study their behavior. He cues up a video from a camera he attached to a shark off Maui in January, peak mating season for tiger sharks.

Flickr / malyousif
Flickr / malyousif

Among all the varieties of food that you can find in Hawaii, one item you’ll never find on the menu is shark fin soup. Hawaii was the first state to ban it—back in 2010. And now a leading economy in the Asia Pacific is taking a step in the same direction. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / Carl N San Diego
Flickr / Carl N San Diego

An international group is moving closer to an agreement that would restrict world wide trade in sharks. But one country in Asia is resisting — and it’s not China. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.