President Donald Trump

Jacquelyn Martin/AP

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Saturday he canceled a secret weekend meeting at Camp David with Taliban and Afghanistan leaders after a bombing in the past week in Kabul that killed 11 people, including an American soldier, and has called off peace negotiations with the insurgent group.

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President Donald Trump defunded two of Hawaii’s military projects to pay for his administration's southern border wall, including one project deemed high priority by the U.S. Marine Corps. 

Matt York/AP

PHOENIX — The biggest victims of President Donald Trump's tariffs won't necessarily be Mexicans or Chinese or young urbanites who will have to pay more for avocado toast.

The people likely to pay the steepest price for Trump's attempts to bend Mexico and China to his will are poor Americans, who already live close to the financial edge and could have to pay more for everyday purchases.

Maui Brewing Company

A 25 percent tariff on Chinese-made steel poses “a tremendous challenge” for Maui Brewing Company, according to co-founder and owner Garrett Marrero. Uncertainty surrounding the tariffs has led Hawaii’s largest craft brewer to postpone major capital purchases needed to continue the company’s growth.

Wikipedia Commons

The National Immigration Law Center in Los Angeles is prepared for a multi-year battle in the courts and U.S. Congress to oppose Trump Administration policies that aim to restrict both legal and illegal immigration. 

U.S. Navy photo by Marshall Fukuki

More than $300 million in funding for military construction projects in Hawaii could potentially be diverted to pay for a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. After declaring a national emergency, President Trump directed the Defense Department to identify projects from which funds could be repurposed.

The White House / Wikimedia Commons

President Trump is delivering his State of the Union address, which the White House says will outline a "policy agenda both parties can rally behind." Yet the speech follows the longest shutdown in U.S. history, and the deadline to avoid another one is in less than two weeks. NPR reporters covering the White House, Congress, immigration, national security and more are annotating his remarks live, adding context and analysis.