poke

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon/HPR

GILBERT, Ariz. — When picking a name for their Asian-Mexican fusion restaurant in suburban Phoenix, Paul and Nicole Fan settled on “Panda Libre,” hoping the mix of China's iconic bear and the Spanish word for “free" would signal to customers the type of cuisine it offered.

Protests are being planned in Chicago following Aloha Poke Company’s push to trademark the words “aloha poke.” While the controversy may have hit a sore spot for some in the native Hawaiian community, it has also sparked a conversation about protecting native Hawaiian rights to intellectual property. HPR Reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has more.

U.S. Department of State / Flickr

Copyright Controversy, Hiroshima Peace Ceremony, Plastics & Greenhouse Gases, Portfolio Project

photoskate / Flickr

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs says it is “appalled” by a Chicago-based company’s attempt to trademark the phrase “Aloha Poke.” The controversy has sparked a debate about language and “ownership.” It’s also raised the question of whether anyone can “own” Aloha.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

The state Department of Health is advising caution for Oahu residents who have recently eaten poke or ahi from a series of local stores and restaurants.

Why Hawaii Poke Is Taking The Mainland By Storm

Nov 3, 2016
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon/HPR

According to the Wall Street Journal, poke is one of the culinary trends of 2016. The popular raw-fish dish has taken the mainland by storm, with poke shops popping up across the country. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports on why this Hawaiian staple is gaining a national following.