pacific

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

After its amazingly successful first run, the second Honolulu Biennial opens tonight at Ward Center.  Biennials are all about activating a whole city with art, and now, just about every key city has one. In the 21st-century, Biennials proclaim a city is part of the creative economy, and visitors expect to be wowed by the art, and take part in panels, film showings, and pop up exhibitions, too.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa visited The Honolulu Biennial’s HUB at Ward Center where opening festivities begin tonight.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

The clock is winding down on three decades of U.S. financial aid to certain countries in the Northern Pacific region. U.S. economic assistance under the Compact of Free Association is set to expire in five years – dealing quite a blow to the health care systems in three Pacific Island nations. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports.

PREL
PREL

An initiative to collect and share stories from around the region is getting under way.  A group called Pacific Resources for Education and Learning has launched the Pacific Storytellers Cooperative.

It’s an internet platform for stories from around the Pacific to be uploaded and shared with a global audience.  The cooperative is accepting stories, videos, pictures, and poems from across the region and organizers say the goal is bridge the gap between oral history and the digital world.

Melissa Lum & Pacific Students Media
Melissa Lum & Pacific Students Media

  Twelve groups of dancers from across Micronesia, craft demonstrations, a little marketplace, a Chamorro food truck, you will get an immersion in Micronesian culture tomorrow, 10-4, at the Honolulu Museum of Art School.  It's all part of the Celebrate Micronesia! Festival and HPR’s Noe Tanigawa discovered all that is just the tip of the iceberg.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  Ecologists and divers are the first to wax poetic about Palau, recognized as one of the richest underwater dive spots in the world.  Palau’s reefs are at the crossroads of three of the planet's major currents and the nutrient-dense water helps create the most bio-diverse region in the world, here in the Pacific.  In this final segment of a series on Palau, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa takes a look at the future.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  The first habitations on Palau could date to ten thousand years ago, settled by sailors from Indonesia or the Philippines.  Like Hawai‘i, Palau’s period of Western contact began in the late 1700’s, with trade, missionaries and change to follow.  In a recent visit, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa found that though Palau’s traditional matrilineal society is beginning to change, women wield a lot of power in the home and in government.

  Midway through the Reagan years, the US entered into the Compact of Free Association with the Federated States of Micronesia. Today, many people understand little about it or the Pacific Islander experience in Hawaii. Next in our series based on the book, the Value of Hawaii2, we’ll talk with two contributors- Innocenta Sound-Kikku and Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner -and UHM student, Kat Lobendahn, who works with the Palolo Pipeline Project geared to help Pacific Islanders.  Today at 5pm on HPR2