noe tanigawa

Tommy Pierucki
Tommy Pierucki

Local boy, Zak Noyle is recognized as one of the best water photographers in the world.  His shot of trash arcing overhead in a wave in Indonesia is featured in National Geographic right now, and you’ve seen his work in Sports Illustrated and on ESPN.  He was senior staff photographer at Surfer magazine by age 25, but he’s seen the business change. He’s hoping this year’s Doris Duke Surf Film Festival will put a new generation of surf filmmakers on the map.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

eady availability of local produce is one lasting contribution consumers enjoy, thanks to recent combined efforts of chefs creating cachet and demand, farmers being encouraged to grow and expand offerings, and the counties and other entities that have supported farmers' markets.Credit Noe TanigawaEdit | Remove

Food is a shared national obsession these days, and the way we eat now has its roots in a movement that began in California in the 1970’s.  Increased awareness of fresh and local became the basis for Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine in 1991, and it got us excited about Hawai‘i’s rich food culture.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa looks at where we are, thirty years later.

Hui Noeau
Hui NOeau

Hui No‘eau is a sturdy arts non-profit in Upcountry Maui.  They offer community facilities for glass, jewelry making, printing, and more, and are open to the public daily, free of charge. Now through July 26th, they are showing artwork based on Six Word Memoirs.

creative commons
creative commons

Today, nearly thirty years after the Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine Movement began, it’s hard to believe how much eating in Hawai‘i has changed.  Recently, a Pomona College Professor was at UH Mānoa discussing the Japanese influence on fine dining and how Honolulu’s contemporary food scene has roots in that evolution.

Estate of John Kelly
Estate of John Kelly

John Melville Kelly was a printmaker at a time of transition in Hawai‘i.  His iconic images graced the menu covers at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, and much more.  While his work is available online, an opportunity to see originals has just been extended at the Halekūlani.

Mayumi Oda
Mayumi Oda

Artist Mayumi Oda who lives in Kealakekua is represented in major international collections, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Since 1992, Oda has dedicated herself to a nuclear free world, and she’s showing some of her best work in Hilo now.

Thomas Osborne
Thomas Osborne

The live music experience is easy to fall out of, what with anything you want available, any time you want it, wherever you are.  The thing is, being in a room with musical instruments vibrating, and musicians leaning into their efforts, is a very different experience and Honolulu offers some bracing encounters you may not have expected. 

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

In gratitude for the thirty years Hawai‘i has nurtured his professional life, Hawai‘i Symphony principal oboist Scott Janusch came up with a novel idea. He would use a piece of endemic Hawaiian wood to create a very special oboe, one that can be passed on to future generations.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Elmer Omar Pizo was born in the Philippines, where he went to seminary school, then worked in Saudi Arabia.  Twenty nine years ago, Pizo immigrated to Hawai‘i and has worked in vector control, landscaping, carpentry, and security, all the while, quietly writing poetry.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, his first collection is a window into Filipino life.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Today, the last day of Poetry Month, we hear from the late W.S. Merwin, award winning U.S. Poet Laureate. He spent his last three decades cultivating a palm garden at his home in Peahi, Maui.  His narrative, The Folding Cliffs, combines western epic poetry with Hawaiian chant.  In 2008, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa talked with Merwin about achieving that synthesis.

Byeok Song
Byeok Song

Graphic artist Byeok Song created propaganda for the North Korean regime in the 1990’s.  During the economic depression there, hunger led to prison time for him, and to his escape through China to South Korea.  Song now works under an alias to protect his family, using art to bring attention to his homeland.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Reem Bassous
Reem Bassous

Painter Reem Bassous drew on history, psychology, philosophy, current events, and her childhood experiences in war-ravaged Beirut to create her current paintings.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, her students at Leeward Community College are given tools for expression and an opportunity to do research and synthesize their own experiences too.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Honolulu is having an Art Moment, and now is the time to take advantage of it.  Many offerings are free!

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Creativity is the number one soft skill sought by employers, according to LinkedIn.  Beginning today, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa looks at two artists who approach creativity in different ways – starting with artist and educator Duncan Dempster.

Meleanna Meyer
Meleanna Meyer

Recently, educators from Kamehameha Schools’ Ho’olaukoa Design and Strategies team gathered at Ho‘omaluhia Garden to experience a new teaching method called Arting and Writing.  This approach uses Hawai‘i based ideas and the environment to help learners find their own motivation. 

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Twenty-six percent of adults in the U.S. have some type of disability, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s one in four Americans.  As part of a movement to understand people with disabilities, a new dance approach has emerged – and it challenges norms onstage.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Netflix’s popular Chef’s Table series introduces chefs worldwide who are creating fancy, eye-popping food.  Unexpectedly, a Korean nun’s episode about temple cooking proved a favorite.  Recently, Jeong Kwan was invited to Honolulu to cook and share her ideas with KCC culinary students and others.

Hawai'i Craftsmen
Hawai'i Craftsmen

Hawai‘i’s artists, designers, and makers are being invited to pitch ideas for a new community art center in the City’s Chinatown Gateway Plaza.  Several key Honolulu arts organizations have secured a trial space for a pop up this Saturday, then for two and a half months.  If all goes well, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, a vibrant art center could make it easy for Honolulu’s business people to get creative.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Honolulu is having an art moment, with fine international artworks on view around town.  For example, the Sunday Times UK called Lisa Reihana’s “Emissaries” the best artwork at the 2017 Venice Biennale.  The work, representing New Zealand, left Venice with accolades and bookings in Paris, London, Vienna, and guess what? “Emissaries” is now in Honolulu in a particularly revealing installation.

Kanikapila Sunday features three hours of Great Hawaiian Music, including contemporary, traditional and hapa haole songs. You'll also hear slack key guitar and ‘ukulele instrumentals. Plus, the Kanikapila Sunday Classic! Tune in every Sunday with host Derrick Malama from 1:00-4:00 PM Hawai’i Time on HPR-1.

Today, please join me with HPR's Noe Tanigawa and special guests Danny Carvalho and Jeff Peterson for the Kanikapila Sunday Fund Drive Special.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

A new exhibition at the UH Mānoa Art Gallery proposes a mysterious island floating in the Pacific.  A nuclear submarine has been lost and the crew shipwrecks on the island, where they begin to discover secrets about its radioactive history.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports the exhibition offers artifacts and interactive technology for a full transmedia experience of Isotopia Pacifica.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Hawai‘i’s last Queen, Lili‘uokalani, was born September 2, 1838, and died November 11, 1917.  The centennial commemoration of her death is beginning this weekend at ‘Iolani Palace with a free celebration of her music, and an exhibit of revealing artifacts is also underway at UH Hamilton Library.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

The 2017 Artists of Hawai‘i exhibition at the Honolulu Museum of Art is more about experience than depiction this year.  Kasey Lindley’s video installation merges technology and play.  Another installation, made of tissue, cloth and thread, burrows into both body and psyche.  Kaori Ukaji spoke to HPR’s Noe Tanigawa about her piece, Serenely  Proliferating.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

For those who saw it in 2012, artist Kaili Chun’s twenty four hour pop up installation of fifty 8-foot steel cells on Waimānalo Beach was a testimony to the mute power of art.  Right now, her installation of fishnets at the Honolulu Museum and hundreds of copper fish at the Prince Waikīkī nicely bookend Chun’s ideas about global systems and the importance of place.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Roseanne Barr
Roseanne Barr

Comedian, television personality, Roseanne Barr has been living on Hawai‘i island for the last eight years.  She and her family recently opened a store, Honoka‘a Country Market, selling locally raised Andrade beef and soon, her own nuts, pineapples, and produce.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught up with Roseanne ahead of her stand up shows at the Blue Note, Saturday and Sunday.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

People gravitate to Andrew Binkley’s “Stone Cloud” at Foster Garden.  Part of the Honolulu Biennial, it is big, and looks quite heavy, hovering over the heads of those who wander by.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught up with Binkley there in the Garden to find out what he had in mind.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Matthew James combines painting and sculpture in his large three dimensional wall pieces.  You can see several around Honolulu now---the largest is a twenty-one by fifteen foot wall of blue wave patterns on the mauka side of Ala Moana Boulevard, on the Salt complex.  You can also see his work in Italy, Miami, New York City, Manila, Iceland, and other locations.  James left Hawai‘i for New York City seventeen years ago, and HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught him at his studio in Brooklyn for these reflections.

Melissa Chimera
Melissa Chimera

In just four years, the annual Contact exhibition has become a focal point of art and community at the Honolulu Museum School.  It’s setting a new model with initiatives to assist making ambitious works plus community activities for the whole two week run.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Not just the art crowd, it’s everybody battling to get into Yayoi Kusama’s infinity Rooms at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington.  Tickets sell out in minutes, and viewers still have to wait hours for their 20 seconds in each room!  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports eagle eyed art lovers have spotted our own Kusama installation in Honolulu, her pink spotted Footprints of Life, part of the Honolulu Biennial at Foster Garden.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  The 2010 U.S. Census reported that Chamorro, the indigenous people of the Mariana Islands, are the third largest Pacific Islander group in the US.  Chamorro arrived in Hawaii aboard whaling ships in the  1800’s, and a community of seven thousand lives here now.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Craig Santos Perez,  a Chamorro writer living in Hawai‘i who has just won an American Book Award.

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