native Hawaiians

Nate Yuen

Images from Mauna Kea of police arresting kupuna or elders and those of protesters chained to a cattle grate  can elicit strong emotions from many who see them. But for some native Hawaiians, these sights can serve as reminders of past injustices, triggering what the American Psychological Association calls “historical trauma.”

Catherine Cruz/Hawaii Public Radio

State lawmakers are seeking to change the way Hawaiʻi votes for trustees of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. 

Laulani Teale / Mauna Kea Hui

Native Hawaiian leaders opposing construction of the Thirty-Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea are taking their grievances beyond the shores of Hawaiʻi to TMT decision-makers and a financier in the Bay Area. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has more.

Andre Perez

Last week’s arrest of members of a Hawaiian sovereignty group brought up an often asked question in the Hawaiian community, “Who exactly speaks for native Hawaiians?”As HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports, the answer may be more complex than imagined.

Wayne Yoshiyoka

Hawaiʻi’s primary election is just two days away. While a lot of attention is focused on the Governor’s race, there’s a lot at stake for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs as well. HPR Reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has more.

Wikimedia Commons

The concept of private property was introduced to Hawaiʻi with the Great Māhele of 1848. That action is often blamed for a lack of land ownership among native Hawaiians…a situation that lasts to this day. Some also say it plays a role in explaining why Native Hawaiians are statistically at the bottom of the barrel when it comes to quality of life. HPRʻs Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports on research that sheds new light on this complex history of land in Hawaiʻi.