Missile Defense

Ryan Finnerty

Anyone who has driven on Oahu’s south shore has likely seen a large white dome floating in Pearl Harbor. The Golf Ball, as it’s known to Oahu residents, is actually a sea-based ballistic missile radar that is capable of transoceanic travel. HPR was recently given a tour of the massive ship.

The Conversation: Wednesday, June 20th, 2018

Jun 20, 2018
United States Navy

Caldwell vetoes surge pricing; Eroding Support for Democracy; Potential Sites for Missile Defense System; Edokko

Wikimedia Commons

Given the recent diplomatic thaw between the U.S. and North Korea, it’s easy to forget that those countries’ leaders were threatening mutual annihilation last year. As part of that escalation, the U.S. Missile Defense Agency began exploring the possibility of constructing a ground-based defensive radar in Hawaii.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

  South Korea’s new president is shifting policy when it comes to a program of missile defense. The move involves U.S. military hardware and issues relating to the environment. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / IAEA Imagebank
Flickr / IAEA Imagebank

According to Reuters, the U.S. Military’s controversial anti-missile system has reached initial operating capacity in South Korea. The news agency quotes U.S. officials as cautioning that it will still be months before THAAD is fully operational – the acronym stands for Theater High Altitude Area Defense. And, as we hear from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute, there is growing sentiment to install the system in Japan.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

It remains to be seen what impact Donald Trump’s plans to expand military spending may have on Hawai‘i. But elsewhere in the Pacific, military cooperation between allies is leading to an unusual situation with a global company. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.