#MeToo

AP Photo/Chris Pizzello

NEW YORK — Longtime MSNBC host Chris Matthews abruptly retired from his “Hardball” show on Monday, apologizing for making inappropriate comments about women and following a brutal week where he also took heat from supporters of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

Mark Lennihan/AP

Updated 2/24/20, 10:10 a.m.

NEW YORK — Harvey Weinstein was convicted Monday of rape and sexual assault against two women and was led off to prison in handcuffs, sealing his dizzying fall from powerful Hollywood studio boss to archvillain of the #MeToo movement.

Mark Lennihan/AP

NEW YORK (AP) — The jury deliberating in Harvey Weinstein's rape trial indicated Friday that it is deadlocked on the most serious charges.

In a note sent to the judge during their lunch break, jurors posed a question asking if it were permissible for them to be hung on two counts of predatory sexual assault while reaching a unanimous verdict on other charges.

Sandra Oshiro/HPR

A 2019 University of Hawaii student survey shows an increase in sexual harassment and unwanted contact reports despite efforts to address the problem.

Mark Lennihan/AP

NEW YORK — A key accuser in the New York City rape trial of Harvey Weinstein broke down in tears on the witness stand on Monday during an exhaustive cross-examination over the nature of her relationship with the once-powerful movie mogul.

Mark Lennihan/AP

NEW YORK — More than two years after a wave of sexual assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein ushered in the #MeToo movement, the disgraced movie mogul faces another reckoning: a criminal trial that could him put him behind bars for the rest of his life.

Ashley Mizuo/HPR

The first local survey focused on sexual harassment in the workplace found that lifelong Hawaii residents were half as likely to report harassment compared to those who moved to the state in the last 10 years.

Flowers With Muscle

Nov 27, 2018
Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Painter Lynda Hess discovered clay recently, and while she was working, she thought about the Biblical origins of men and women.  This idea developed, becoming her new installation at the HiSAM Gallery x MORI Shop in the Hawai‘i State Art Museum.

Pixabay

  This month marked the anniversary of the #MeToo movement. UH Professor Tamar Kreps of the Shidler School of Business sat down with us to talk about what happens now.

She specializes in Organizational Behavior, Ethics, and Social Psychology.

 

  

Karen Kelsky

It’s been a year since the MeToo hashtag spread virally on social media, sparking a movement against sexual harassment. Academia – like Hollywood, the media and Congress – faced its own Me Too movement. HPR Reporter Ku’uwehi Hiraishi sits down with someone who’s been following the issue closely.

The Conversation: Friday, March 30th, 2018

Mar 30, 2018
National Park Service

Wildfire Risk; Female Legislators and #MeToo; Made in Hawaii Movie; Hawaii Pickleball League

Changing Workplace Etiquette

Mar 2, 2018
U.S. Army

Many of the sexual harassment scandals that have surfaced through the #MeToo movement have occurred in the workplace. The movement shows no signs of going away, and that means workers of both genders need to refine a kind of workplace etiquette that can't be misunderstood.

The Conversation: Friday, March 2nd, 2018

Mar 2, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Changing Workplace Etiquette; Collecting Tourism Data; Past and Future of Nuclear Weapons; Masters of the Currents

The Conversation: Monday, January 8th, 2018

Jan 8, 2018
Wayne Yoshioka

What Comes After #MeToo? Stories of Sex Workers; Displaced Marco Polo Residents; Kid Pan Alley

The Conversation: Tuesday, December 19th, 2017

Dec 19, 2017
Pixabay

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Robin Zebrowski / Flickr
Robin Zebrowski / Flickr

Last week brought another wave of developments related to sexual harassment. While the “hashtag me too” movement has swept across this country, it’s been a very different story in China. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Evelina Galang
Evelina Galang

Award winning writer and educator, M. Evelina Galang, runs into a lot of people who don’t realize that Koreans were not the only WWII “comfort women.”  “Comfort women” is the euphemism for girls and women abducted and raped by Japanese soldiers across the so-called co-prosperity sphere, including Korea through China and the Philippines.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Galang’s new book, Lolas' House, which opens a window onto the Filipina experience.