Lava Flow

Big Island Video News
Big Island Video News

 

   As lava moves into Pahoa Village, Hawaii County Civil Defense and the Community Emergency Response Teams have been going door to door to talk with residents and ensure they are ready to evacuate.  HPR's Sherry Bracken has the story of one couple who had that conversation.

lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com
lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com

  

  News coverage of the Pahoa lava flow has often been presented as a “horror movie in slow motion”. The focus for many has been a timeline to when the molten rock may reach Pahoa village. But some people are not happy with the negative tone of coverage.

Dana Kenny is a realtor with an office in Pahoa. He says that it will be sad if homes and roads are lost, but the town will not be destroyed, and the sense of panic is unnecessary.

He argues that on Maui, Hana has survived and is a popular destination, despite its isolation.

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

  The lava flow in Pahoa has been dominating news across the state in recent days. But it’s also getting a lot of attention in Asia. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute

Pahoa Residents Prepare as Lava Edges Closer

Oct 29, 2014
Molly Solomon / Molly Solomon

Lava flowing from Kilauea Volcano towards the town of Pāhoa has finally arrived, crossing residential property lines early Tuesday morning. Residents have had weeks to prepare for this slow-moving disaster and are now faced with the reality that their homes and businesses could be in danger. HPR’s Molly Solomon is in Pāhoa and has this report.

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

  As lava continues to snake through the Pāhoa area,  most local residents are feeling anxious.   And the adults in a family need to address not only their own concerns but also the fears of their keiki.  HPR’s Sherry Bracken today brings us the second part of her conversation with a Hilo psychologist.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

  In Pahoa, the main lava flow has slowed down, but smaller fingers are approaching buildings.

A North-side breakout is about 100 feet from the fence of the transfer station.  The South-side breakout is less than 100 feet from the residence that previously lost their storage shed.  The lava is expected to make contact with the home if it continues at its current rate.

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

  As lava continues its relentless advance through the Puna District of the Big Island, there has been a lot of emphasis on physical preparation.  But for everybody whose lives are going to be touched one way or the other by the advancing lava flow, dealing with the emotional fallout is also important.  HPR’s Sherry Bracken talked with a psychologist about some of the issues.

Lava Flow Overtakes Pāhoa Japanese Cemetery

Oct 26, 2014
USGS
USGS

Hawaii County Civil Defense are keeping a close watch on a lava flow that continues to move toward Pāhoa. It's picked up speed in recent days, moving at a speed of 10-15 yards per day. Officials say evacuations may be just days away. 

USGS
USGS

The lava flow heading towards Pahoa reached Apaa Street early Saturday morning. County officials say the lava crossed the road at 3:50 a.m. and was advancing at a rate of 10 yards per hour.

As of Saturday afternoon, the lava flow front is just six-tenths of a mile from Pahoa Village Road, the main drag that runs through town. County crews are currently going door-to-door to about 50 homes, alerting residents that are down-slope of the flow to prepare for a possible evacuation in the next three to five days.

Lava Flow Quickly Advances Toward Pahoa

Oct 24, 2014
USGS
USGS

UPDATED:

A Friday morning flyover revealed the lava flow had moved 300 yards overnight. Hawaii County Civil Defense officials say the leading edge of the approaching flow is now 250 yards, or less than one tenth of a mile, from Apaa Street, near the Pāhoa Transfer Station.

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

  With the lava from Kilauea Volcano steadily advancing towards Pahoa, less than a mile from Apa’a Street and the Pāhoa Transfer Station, the need to provide emergency access has become even more urgent.  And now it looks like a solution has been reached.  HPR’s Sherry Bracken has the story.

www.bigislandvideonews.com
www.bigislandvideonews.com

  The lava creeping slowly towards Pāhoa continues to advance and is now a little under a mile from Apa’a Street near the Pahoa transfer station.  A brush fire yesterday of about 300 acres is mostly out and fully contained.  It is also creating  smokey conditions.   As the situation changes, the County and State are taking additional steps to protect peoples’ health.  HPR’s Sherry Bracken tells us more.

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

One of the concerns of Hawaii County officials and residents is how the recent and current disasters —Tropical Storm Iselle and the lava flow —will affect Hawaii Island's economy.  HPR's Sherry Bracken has an update.

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

The latest report from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and Hawai'i County Civil Defense says after a week of little to no movement of the front of the lava flow near Pahoa Village, it advanced yesterday about 25 yards.  There are also some lava fingers breaking out higher up the volcano.  HPR's Sherry Bracken talked to Mayor Billy Kenoi to get an update on how Hawaii County is preparing.

Searching for Family Roots in Pahoa

Sep 29, 2014
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

As the lava flow from Kīlauea threatens to hit the town of Pāhoa, the potential cutting off of memories is also a concern. As part of our ongoing series, HPR’s Molly Solomon takes a personal look at what that means to people who may never be able to go back.

Remembering Kalapana: Looking Back at What Was Lost

Sep 25, 2014
Erin Datlof
Erin Datlof

The town of Pāhoa on Hawaii's Big Island is making preparations to deal with the possibility of a lava flow. And while it’s stalled for now, officials are continuing to monitor the active flow, where a breakout continues to move. It’s a familiar story for residents in that area, many of whom have gone through this once before. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Officials are saying lava heading towards Pāhoa on Hawaii's Big Island has slowed for now. But that isn't putting anyone at ease. Over the next few days, we’ll hear stories of how people are dealing with this uncertainty. HPR’s Molly Solomon spent some time in Pāhoa, and found a town with a colorful past and an uncertain future.

Tiffany Edwards Hunt
Tiffany Edwards Hunt

The progress of the lava flow on the Big Island of Hawai‘i has slowed.  It’s moved more than ten miles since it began its current flow on June 27th. And as it lingers outside Pāhoa town, local residents are sharing memories about the island’s last lava flow that wiped out a town.  HPR’s Sherry Bracken reports.

Baron Sekiya / Hawaii247.com
Baron Sekiya / Hawaii247.com

On yesterday's flight over the active lava flow from Kilauea Volcano's Pu'u 'O'o Vent, Civil Defense saw no new advance in the flow.  The brushfire is now contained.  The flow front is around 100 yards wide and still around one and a half miles away from Apa'a Road.  HPR's Sherry Bracken has been checking in with merchants in Pahoa Village.

Earlier this week, Dave Corrigan from Big Island Video News shot video of the lava during a flyover:

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

The lava flow from Kilauea Volcano's Pu'u 'O'o Vent is continuing its slow movement towards Pahoa and beyond.  HPR's Sherry Bracken talked with the Mayor yesterday to get the latest update.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

  As the lava advances towards Pahoa, there is still uncertainty.  But one certainty is that there will likely be disruption to the schools near or even in the path of the lava flow.  HPR's Sherry Bracken has an update.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Trash is a fact of life for everybody. In Pāhoa, the County opened a new $3.9 million dollar transfer station just three years ago to serve the fastest growing area of the island. But now, its existence is threatened by the lava flow coming from the Pu'u 'O'o vent. HPR's Sherry Bracken looked into what the county is planning.

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Hawai'i County has now opened an Incident Command Center in Pāhoa  Village, close to where the lava  from Kīlauea’s Pu’u ‘O’o Vent may enter town.  Key county personnel are on hand to provide the latest information for concerned residents.  HPR’s Sherry Bracken talked with Mayor Billy Kenoi about how the County is addressing this latest crisis.

Baron Sekiya
Baron Sekiya

  Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and Hawai'i County Civil Defense are continuing to monitor the lava making its way towards homes and businesses in Pāhoa.  There are daily helicopter overflights, and both private and government agencies are busily preparing.  HPR’s Sherry Bracken has a report from Hawai'i Island.

Baron Sekiya
Baron Sekiya

  Some Puna residents and businesses owners in Pahoa Village have now accepted the stark reality that lava is heading their way.  But as HPR's Sherry Bracken reports, the timing and precise direction remain uncertain.

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