fine art

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

In 2017, Sean O’Harrow fondly recalled formative years at the old Art Academy, as he threw himself into implementing change as the Honolulu Museum of Art’s first Hawai‘i-born Director.  Just over two years later, many are surprised that O’Harrow is leaving.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Now that it’s the time of year for special gifts, lovers of fine craft and locally made art are wondering what has become of Nohea Gallery, formerly in Ward Warehouse.  Far from fading away, Nohea moved into the Hyatt Regency, and now, Nohea Gallery has opened a flagship store in Kāhala Mall.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports they’ve been connecting artists and art lovers for the past 28 years.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

The Hawai‘i Craftsmen showcase fine, handmade-in-Hawai‘i creations every year, with a special commitment to Neighbor Island artists.   Their 51st Statewide Juried Exhibition honors Honolulu sculptor and educator Fred Roster, whose personal connection between heart and hand has shaped generations of artists. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Artist Tommy Hite is perhaps best known for his realistic paintings of dumpsters around Honolulu.  The ubiquitous bins are often in scenic locations, and who can forget Hite’s dumpster at the end of the rainbow?  His new show features historic European portraits, localized, for example, someone’s regal hat becomes a Zippy’s chili container.  HPR's Noe Tanigawa reports, it’s all in the details.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

A new gallery on Nu‘uanu Street is adding to the art buzz in Honolulu.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports the Ravizza Brownfield Gallery has opened with a distinctly different mission, one that adds another dimension to Hawai‘i‘s cultural cachet.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  

  American painting first burst onto the world art scene in the 1950’s with energetic abstract paintings by Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, and others.  They were followed by a generation of painters who toyed with irony, pop culture, and consumerism into the 2000’s.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on a show at the UH Art Gallery that heralds a rebirth of abstraction.