DJ Mermaid

Toots Hibbert, frontman and lead vocalist of Toots & The Maytals, passed away a few days ago so tonight we're honoring his music and exploring the music that was influenced by Toots and the Maytals.

@hui_ku_maoli_ola on Instagram

Volume 2 and the conclusion of last week's tour around Oʻahu through mele.

Paige Okamura

Oʻahu makaʻewaʻewa, mai kuhihewa! Tonight we're going to kaʻapuni a puni o Oʻahu and see the sights and learn the history of this island - my home - because as our kupuna have said, "Oʻahu is the Center of the Seas."

@elesq on Instagram

Our very own dj mr.nick HAD A BABY! Actually, his wife did 90% of the work on that one, but I am still extremely excited be an aunty. Congratulations to Sarah and Nick on their newborn little baby that I will be loving on as soon as we make it through this pandemic. 

Tonight's episode of BTG is themed around music thatʻs calm, soulful, but still fire. It's the kind of music that gets me through the week, especially one that includes the start of another stay-at-home mandate.

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On the surface, tonight's playlist seems like a random hodge-podge of music that wouldn't go together well, but they all have one common factor that allows them to get along: a harp! Much like my "ʻUkulele In Strange Places" show, tonight's playlist is a culmination of collecting songs that feature or are accompanied by a harp.

Diving deep into hapa-haole music tonight, and trying to define what makes up this specifically unique genre of music in Hawai'i.

Upbeat indie-electro-soul-pop is what's on the agenda for tonight's episode of Bridging The Gap.

@danielsullivangallery on Instagram

Super calm and relaxing music for our collective post-hurricane nerves. I'm just glad we're all safe.

Spinning a collection of loverʻs rock to rockaway to this sultry summer evening.

Special thanks to dj mr.nick & Harrison Patino for contributing to tonight's playlist!

Paige Okamura

A year ago to the day, I put my entire life on hold, packed my warm clothes and survival gear into a dry-bag duffle and hopped on an early morning flight to Kona. To quote Joseph Nāwahī, "O ke Aloha Aina, oia ka Ume Mageneti iloko o ka puuwai o ka Lahui." Just two days prior, I had a done a show with the intent of highlighting the honoring of mountains in Hawaiian music, and for various reasons ended up changing its tone. I don't have a lot of regrets, but changing that show's original intent is one of them.

In celebration of 8 years of Bridging The Gap, I'm taking a stroll down memory lane and re-visiting some of my best shows during my tenure as one of its hosts. One of my favorite and most popular shows is the tribute to Territorial Airwaves show I did last year when the program turned 40 years old.

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Keeping it low key, mellow, and smooth tonight with some of my favorite indie and soul artists. Perfect music for relaxation and reflection.  

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Sometimes, the best music is born out of social movements against injustice. Some songs even end up as rally calls or the theme song for the movement it was born of, and for future movements. Tonight we are taking a look at some of the music that born out of recent movements around the world - most of which are on-going movements that are still active today. 

Paige Okamura

It's been a little over a year since my trip to Aotearoa, which happened to be the trip I'd been dreaming of my whole life thus far. It was beautiful, enlightening, culturally enriching, and full of dairy that didn't make me sick! 

Tonight's show is volume two of Māori waiata - including a few new songs that have come out within the past year. Nau mai, haere mai, ki te pae.

Most of the music we hear today has deep roots in black culture - music made by black people - and we would be purposefully ignorant not to recognize and pay tribute to that fact. This show is definitely not finite, and could easily go on for days if not months, but it does allow me to use the two hours I have to highlight black voices both old and new.

LA Johnson/NPR

Letting the music speak for itself and keeping most of my anecdotes to myself tonight because it's not about me - it's about amplifying the voices of those who have gone unheard for generations.

For some persepective, check out this episode of Code Swtich titled, "A Decade Of Watching Black People Die".  

Tonight we're playing with the idea of "retro sound", with retro soul being the vehicle. The guiding thought is the music of today inspired by the sounds of yesterday. There's no exact formula, just a whole lotta feel.

artwork by Kevin Lau, @klhrdesign

Inspired by the May 8th episode of This American Life titled "Stuck!", which featured stories of people feeling stuck in a time when most of us "feel like we are living in a holding pattern" I wondered that feeling or concept would sound like in music form.

All of the music in tonight's show is about being stuck or feeling trapped and the various situations we find ourselves in during this stay-at-home order.

I always love finding out what my co-workers are listening to and/or what music influences their lives. The other day I asked Russell Subiono, our resident Pledge Drive guru, if he would be so kind as to curate tonight's show and he graciously accepted.

His playlist is aptly named "Memories & Roots" and the songs are nostalgic to his youth and his homeland, Waimea.

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As the saying goes, "May Day is Lei Day in Hawaiʻi" and it is true. Unfortunately, many Lei Day celebrations across the paeʻāina have been cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic. Yet many of us continued to celebrate in our own ways at home e kui ana, e wili ana, a e haku ana i nā ʻano lei like ʻole. Although it is Cinco de Mayo, I'm not Mexican and could never do a Cino de Mayo show justice. However, I am Hawaiian, and can give you a heck of a good lei day show, so that's what we're doing tonight!

University of Hawaiʻi Hawaiian Collection

ʻO ka wā i hala... tongiht's show is intended to transport us to the Hawaiʻi that once was in a time that seems long gone. These recordings are as old as the 1920s, and as new as the 1940s. Sounds that aren't heard anymore, I recently remarked to a good friend of mine that "I wish music still sounded like this." Can you believe, the year 1920 is exactly a century ago from today.

I love me a good cover song. To me, a really good cover song can give a song a whole new feel and make you hear it like you've never heard it before. Songs that you're used to hearing all your life suddenly become more clear in meaning when someone else sings it in their own way. For example, Nick Kurosawa's cover of Kalapana's "What Do I Do?" takes on a whole new meaning when slowed down and sung acoustic by a smooth crooner and a guitar. Somehow, the gravity of the lyrics had been lost on me all my life until Nick covered it. 

The name of the genre game tonight is indie folk rock, which is rather broad and includes music that have influences from country, blues, bluegrass, and americana. The music from tonight's show also works well as a running playlist. Trust me, I tested it out the other day and unexpectedly ran 3 miles.

 

Tonight's show is full of songs of positivity and hope for the better days to come - with a nod to Bill Withers, who recently passed away at the age of 81. All of the songs tie in to the theme through title, lyrics, or melody. I like to think of it as a playlist you can throw on when you need a little positive pick-me-up, or something to get and take a dance break to when you're feeling the stay-at-home blues.

I'm really excited to finally debut this show because it's been in the making for months. Usually we're used to hearing the ʻukulele in Hawaiian music, so to hear it used in music that's not Hawaiian, has always been pleasantly strange to me. Over the last 6 months or so, I've been collecting non-Hawaiian songs that utilize an ʻukulele in them, and this is the result.  

The music in tonight's show is a collection of the music I've been listening to and discovering while being mandated to stay put at home. It's also based off my discovery of two latin musical artists: Lido Pimienta, and the all-female mariachi band Flor de Toloache. Lots of world sounds and languages to take your mind off the current pandemic situation we're in.

Tonight's episode is co-curated by Mister Modular of KTUH FM Honolulu. His real name is Leon Naldo, and we're also fortunate to have him on staff here at HPR as a board operator. Leon has a degree in Information & Computer Science and he's been an on-air DJ at KTUH for 7 years. His show "My Little Corner of the World" airs every Friday from 9 AM to noon.

This past Saturday, the last day of Hawaiian Language Month, I was asked to DJ an event put on by Mana Studios + Purple Maiʻa called "ʻŌlelo Jam." Mana Studios created a program called "ʻŌlelo Flix" where the public can translate the subtitles of Netflix movies into Hawaiian via a Chrome extension. They also taught keiki how to code in Hawaiian as part of their "Code Haumana" program.

Tonight's episode of Bridging The Gap is split down the middle. The first half is the extended version of my Hawaiian music segment that aired on Here & Now's DJ Sessions last Friday. You'll get to here my extended version of what I would've wanted to showcase if time wasn't an issue, along with my last selection that got cut from the air for time. 

Tonight's episode is all about Motown - the classics as well as some not-so-well-known tracks from the label and its subsidiaries.

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