bishop museum

Ken Yatomi via Bishop Museum

A royal Hawaiian feather cloak and helmet given to Captain James Cook in 1779 are being permanently returned to Hawaiʻi. The items were temporarily on loan to the Bishop Museum with plans to return them to New Zealand, where they have been housed for more than a century.

Snail Extinction Protection Program / Department of Land and Natural Resources

A new project at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum may help researchers find Pacific island land snails thought to be extinct.

Wikimedia Commons

  In our Hawaii Garden and Forest segment, we take you out on the grounds of the Bishop Museum at Kapalama. The Hawaii Tourism Authority is helping to fund programs that are helping to keep the Hawaii Biological Survey up to date.

Its an inventory of plants found across the state and as part of the outreach museum staff are restarting tours of the native gardens on the Kapalama campus that were planted almost a decade ago.

We went along on last month’s inaugural tour led by research specialist who's been at the museum for 35 years.

Marshallese Weaving Cultural Restoration Project

A Pacific Island weaving tradition that nearly went extinct is now making a comeback. Finely woven Marshallese clothing mats made of lauhala or pandanus leaves were on display this weekend at the Bishop Museum. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi was there and filed this report.

Sinoto
Sinoto

Tahitians said artifacts from their past called out to Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto, that he caused them to reveal themselves.  The Bishop Museum’s eminent archaeologist, Dr. Sinoto, passed away in October this year, leaving behind a legacy of ground breaking scholarship, dedicated preservation, and friendships across the Pacific.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa checked in with Dr. Sinoto’s son and a colleague for insights into the man and his work.

The Conversation: Wednesday, June 14th, 2017

Jun 14, 2017
Pixabay

Possible Brain Harm from Moderate Drinking; Hawaii Honeybee Comeback; Bishop Museum’s Way Ahead

Today on Bytemarks Café: Art + Science

May 3, 2017
Pexels / Sebastian Voortman
Pexels / Sebastian Voortman

Today on Bytemarks Café, we’ll find out what is like to be an artist in residence at a science organization. We’ll talk to two artists and find out what they learned while resident at the Schmidt Ocean Institute and the Bishop Museum.

Daniel Ramirez / Flickr
Daniel Ramirez / Flickr

This fall the Bishop Museum is expanding its programming with the return of laser shows and children’s stories with a scientific twist.

The J. Watumull planetarium is hosting a children’s play entitled “The Boy who fell in Love with a Star” which combines the building’s technology and live theater.  The play is written and performed by Adela Chu and storyteller Jeff Gere.  Performances run from October 15th until mid-November, with shows at 9:00 and 10:30.  Gere says it’s a science lesson woven into a children’s story.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

According to the World Wildlife Fund, more than 90% of the plants and animals inhabiting Hawaii are native to this place, and a greater variety of fish exist in Hawaiian waters than anywhere else.  Protecting these plants and creatures can seem overwhelming, but individuals do find ways to make a difference.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on one such case.


noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

 

President Obama is coming to the world conservation congress in Honolulu to herald the creation of the world's largest ecologically protected area, Papahanaumokuakea. The northwestern sweep of Hawai’i’s archipelago is a treasure for biologists, marine scientists, archaeologists, cultural practitioners, naval historians, and others.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports mysterious stone figures are among the items featured in a new exhibit at the Bishop Museum. 

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

   David Kuhn has spent over thirty years as a wildlife guide.  As part of his own process learning Hawai‘i’s forest birds, Kuhn began recording them in the mid ‘90’s.  His audio library now encompasses birds, bats, crickets, whales, waters, and, importantly, the mixed sounds of forest biophanies that are rapidly disappearing.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa visited him in Kōke‘e on Kaua‘i.

“If you close your eyes, would you really feel like you’re there?  That’s my goal.”

Brett Neilson / Flickr
Brett Neilson / Flickr

The President and CEO of Bishop Museum has resigned from his position.  Blair Collis announced his resignation today, ending a five year run in the museum’s top seat.

A news release did not say why he is resigning, but it quoted Collis as saying he is pursuing new opportunities.  The museum’s board of directors has appointed Honolulu attorney Linda Lee Kuuleilani “Cissy” Farm as interim president and CEO, and the board will launch a national search for a permanent replacement.

www.bishopmuseum.org
www.bishopmuseum.org

Two significant pieces of Hawai‘i’s cultural history are returning to the islands this week. They are a very special ‘ahu‘ula and mahiole—or feathered cloak and helmet. In 1779, they were presented to Captain James Cook by Kalaniōpu‘u—the paramount chief of Hawai‘i Island.  HPR guest commentator Noelle Kahanu says the return is important not only because of history, but also because of timing.

Te Papa Tongarewa
Te Papa Tongarewa

    

A set of artifacts present at the contact between Native Hawaiians and Captain Cook are on their way back to the islands.

Daniel Ramirez / Flickr
Daniel Ramirez / Flickr

To last for more than a century, an organization has to reinvent itself. That’s what Bishop Museum president & CEO, Blair Collis, has been doing. Pacific Business News Editor in Chief A. Kam Napier has more.

In 2011, Blair Collis became the youngest chief executive in Bishop Museum’s long history and the first to be promoted to the top spot from within.  Collis rose up through the business side of the museum.  His first director-level job there was as head of Bishop Museum press in 2003, then on to such roles as VP of sales and marketing, chief operating officer, and more.

Brett Neilson / Flickr
Brett Neilson / Flickr

After years of planning, the Bishop Museum is pushing its primary focus back to its visitors.  It’s begun a 5 year plan to help the museum become more self-sustaining and less reliant on government funding.  The museum has already implemented a $24-million renovation to Hawai‘i Hall and the J. Watumull planetarium.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The life of Hawaii’s ambassador of aloha is being celebrated in a new exhibit at the Bishop Museum.

A retrospective of the life and accomplishments of Duke Kahanamoku is the museum’s first exhibition about a single person.  Kahanamoku is remembered as an Olympic champion who popularized the sport of surfing.  He was also a sheriff, a businessman, and an ambassador for Hawaiian culture.  Michael Wilson is an exhibit designer for the Bishop Museum. 

Taimane: Stardust

Mar 23, 2015
amber crago

 

  

   Don Ho first spotted the ‘ukulele phenomenon, Taimane, when she was thirteen, and recording deals and international gigs have followed.  This Saturday, she releases her new album, “We Are Made of Stars,” at the Bishop Museum on the lawn under the stars and in the planetarium.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

All are invited to this free CD release party Saturday, March 28 at the Bishop Museum, Planetarium and Gallery Lawns, 7-10pm.  

Ages All Ages, Picnic on the Lawn. BYOFC (Bring your own food and chairs!)

Honolulu Museum of Art
Honolulu Museum of Art

  

  Hawaiian history buffs will have one last chance to view a beautiful artifact with a tragic history.

noe tanigawa

The Native Hawaiian arts community is growing in strength and diversity, as exemplified in Maoli Arts month celebrations over the last several years.  Now, in its eight year, Maoli arts month, or MAMo, is looking to the future.

Maile Andrade’s show, 'Ike Loloa: A Long Insightful Journey, continues through October 7, 2013