agriculture

Flickr / equalexchangecoop
Flickr / equalexchangecoop

While the wet weather across the islands is only expected to last a matter of days…longer lasting rains are disrupting a favorite crop in Asia. The coffee crop in Indonesia has been hit with wet weather that’s lingered for two months. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Flickr / davidlaiblog
Flickr / davidlaiblog

There's been lots of discussion throughout the state about the need to have more farmers and to have more of our food grown right here at home. On Hawaii Island, there's a program to develop new farmers--and they're looking for candidates. HPR's Sherry Bracken has the story.

Flickr / artist in doing nothing
Flickr / artist in doing nothing

Investigators in Oregon are still trying to determine how genetically modified wheat wound up in a farmer’s field. The incident’s already having an impact in Asia. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Mahi'ai Match-Up: Making Ag Dreams A Reality

May 20, 2013
Mahi‘ai Matchup
Mahi‘ai Matchup

A local contest is making it easier to kickstart a career in agriculture. An open call for land proposals on some of the state’s prime ag lands could result in a five year land lease…for free! HPR’s Molly Solomon reports. 

The Conversation for April 25, 2013

Apr 25, 2013

It’s Thursday, April 25 – From HPR2, it’s The Conversation

Ag to go or ag to grow food?

Ashley Lukens is the Vice President of the Hawaii Food Policy Council and a PhD candidate studying alternative food systems in the Department of Political Science at UH Manoa. She is also a Sea Grant Graduate Trainee, documenting the impact of shifting land use practices and has been following two potentially game-changing bills that could alter the balance of how Hawaii feeds itself.

Growing a New Crop of Young Farmers

Mar 25, 2013
Molly Solomon

This week, Hawaii Public Radio is taking a closer look at food in the islands. We call it “Feeding Ourselves, Hawaii’s Food Future.” All week, we’ll report on a number of issues relating to food. Today, we start with people. The future of locally-grown food not only depends on land, water and crops—it also depends on farmers. The average age of a farmer in Hawaii is now sixty. But there’s one farm in Waianae that’s leading a youth movement—growing not only food, but also growing farmers. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports…

Pages