wearable art

Pa'i Foundation
Pa'i Foundation

The Maoli Arts Movement, or MAMO, Wearable Art Show established a base for native Hawaiian fashion when it began 12 years ago.  Last year, Manaola was the first Hawaiian to step from the MAMO stage into the New York Fashion Week spotlight.  This year, organizer Vicky Holt Takamine says the MAMO runway show features a Maui designer who is ready to take off.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Kyle Wright, courtesy of PAʻI Foundation
Kyle Wright, courtesy of PAʻI Foundation

Nita Pilago’s Wahine Toa designs were a sell out, again, at the recent Merrie Monarch in Hilo.  Just eight years in, her small Kona company is expanding production in Bali and Pilago has a new line of lava themed pieces planned for the upcoming MAMo Wearable Art Show.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Kyle Wright, courtesy of PAʻI Foundation.
Kyle Wright, courtesy of PAʻI Foundation.

The Hawaiian word, maoli, means native, or genuine. When Maoli Arts Month started in 2006, its founders focused on three aspects of the vision: a gallery show of Native Hawaiian fine arts, a high fashion wearable art show, and an arts market that could fuel a boom in maoli art production. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports that eleven years later, opportunities have built capability in the community.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

In the run up through November, Fashion Month, Ala Moana Center is celebrating different facets of Hawai‘i’s fashion industry in a new pop up called the Fashion Annex.  The current exhibition features a view of fashion that is both ancient and possibly futuristic.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa explores the idea of clothing that integrates understanding of culture, materials, and place.