cargo

Anthony Quintano / Flickr

Hurricane Lane only recently departed the Hawaiian Islands but other storms, Hurricanes Norman and Oliva, are moving our way.

The Conversation producer Ryan Finnerty takes a closer look at how storms disrupt the all-important ocean shipping industry here in Hawaii. Brad Dechter is the President of the freight company Dependable Hawaiian Express as Hurricane Lane moved through.

Wikipedia

Volcano Update, Storms and Shipping; Maui Homeless Strategy; Native Hawaiian Health

Ryan Finnerty / Hawaii Public Radio

If you’ve ever ordered anything online, you know that shipping to Hawaii can take a while. That is because the vast majority of goods in Hawaii came here on a ship. But the share delivered by air has been growing steadily for almost 30 years.

In fact, Hawaiian Airlines is the nation’s oldest air cargo carrier. It was issued the first-ever certificate for air freight back during World War Two. This week the company debuted a new fleet of inter-island cargo planes

In America We Trust

Nov 18, 2015
Jessica Sherry
Jessica Sherry

After World War II ended in the Pacific, anthropologists described up to several hundred semi-religious organizations that had sprung up in New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, Fiji and Vanuatu.  Called “cargo cults,” these believers sought ways to continue delivery of wartime goods and supplies.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on a Hawai‘i International Film Festival showing that focuses on what could be the last surviving cargo cult.

“Waiting for John” screens Thursday, November 19 at 3:45pm as part of the Hawai‘i International Film Festival.