Saturday, July 4 2015

---FIRST HALF HOUR---

:04—Arthur Foote (1853-1937): Suite in E for Strings, Op. 63, 1908, fugue, Kenneth Klein, London Symphony [EMI 49263]. The first American composer to achieve an international reputation without having studied in Europe.

:11—Morton Gould (1913-1996): “Sermon,” from “Spirituals for Orchestra,” Howard Hanson, Eastman-Rochester Orchestra [Mercury 432 016]. The first staff pianist at Radio City Music Hall, and president of ASCAP the last eight years of his life.

:15—Mark O’Connor (1961- ): “Wide Open Spaces,” Marin Alsop, Baltimore Symphony [Omac 12]. Seattle-born bluegrass fiddler, and championship winner at the Grand Ole Opry at the age of 13, who has classical training as well.

:20—Elliott Carter (1908-2012): Elegy, 1943, Gerard Schwarz, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra [Nonesuch 79002]. Originally for viola and piano, revised in 1961 for string quartet, here played by a full string orchestra.

:26—William Schuman (1910-1992): “Chester” from “New England Triptych,” Howard Hanson, Eastman-Rochester Orchestra [Mercury 432 755]. Modern arrangement of song of William Billings (1746-1800). Schuman went to his first symphony concert at the age of 19. He studied under Roy Harris.

---SECOND HALF HOUR---

:30—Vincent Persichetti (1915-1987): Sym. for Band, Op. 86, first move., Frederick Fennell, Eastman Wind Ensemble [Mercury432 754]. Professor of composition at Juilliard. His students: Philip Glass, Peter Schickele, Lowell Liebermann.

:36—William Bolcom (1938- ): “Graceful Ghost,” 1970, Richard Dowling, piano [Klavier 77035]. Inspired, Bolcom said, by his late father. Seattle-born, studied under Milhaud and Messiaen, aims to blur the lines between popular and art music.

:41—Dana Suesse (1909-1987): Concerto in Three Rhythms, finale, rag: presto, 1932, Michael Gurt, piano w/Richard Rosenberg, Hot Springs Music Festival Symphony [Naxos 8.559647]. Known as “the female Gershwin.”

:46—Easley Blackwood (1933- ): Sym. No. 5, Op. 34, finale, 1990 James DePreist, Chicago Symphony [Cedille 016]. Patterned to some degree after Sibelius, the third and finale movement combines a scherzo with a finale as Sibelius does in his own Fifth.

:53—Kent Kennan (1913-2003): “Campo di Fiori” from “Three Pieces for Orchestra,” Howard Hanson, Eastman-Rochester Orchestra [Mercury 434 307]. His “Technique of Orchestration” is still widely used as a textbook. The brother of George F. Kennan, an advisor to Truman who helped shape U.S. policy in the Cold War.

:56—Steve Reich (1936- ): “New York Counterpoint,” third move., Evan Ziporyn, clarinets [ Nonesuch 19481].

---THIRD HALF HOUR---

:04—Peter Boyer (1970- ): “Silver Fanfare,” 2004, Peter Boyer, London Philharmonic [Naxos 8.559769]. Written for the silver anniversary of the Pacific Symphony of Orange County, Calif. Rhode Island-born and raised. Moved to L.A. to study film music, writes scores for The History Channel.

:09—Peter Mennin (1923-1983): “Folk Overture,” 1945, Christian Badea, Columbus Symphony [New World 371]. Raised in Erie, Pa., president of Peabody Conservatory, then of Juilliard.

:19—John Alden Carpenter (1876-1951: “Skyscrapers,” excerpt, 1926, Kenneth Klein, London Symphony [EMI 49263]. Best-known for “Adventures in a Perambulator,” 1914, describing a baby’s day from the baby’s point of view.

:22—Walter Piston (1894-1976): Polka finale from “The Incredible Flutist,” 1938, Howard Hanson, Eastman-Rochester Orchestra [Mercury 434 307]. Born in Rockland, Maine, family moved to Boston when he was 11. Studied with Boulanger then taught at Harvard for the rest of his active life.

:25—Samuel Barber (1910-1981): Sym. No. 1, Op. 9, middle move., Marin Alsop, Scottish National Orchestra [Naxos 8.559024].

---FOURTH HALF HOUR---

:30—Aaron Copland (1900-1990): “Music for the Theatre,” first move., 1934, Dennis Russell Davies, Orchestra St. Luke’s [MusicMasters 60162].

:36—Robert Moran (1937- ): “Points of Departure,” 1993, David Zinman, Baltimore Symphony [Argo 444 454]. Born in Denver, studied under Darius Milhaud, settled in Philadelphia. Collaborated with Philip Glass on the opera “The Juniper Tree.”

(TRICK QUESTION: WHO’S THE SINGER IN THIS PIECE?)

:43—Douglas Moore (1893-1969): “Jenny Lind,” from “Pageant of P.T. Barnum,” 1926, Howard Hanson, Eastman-Rochester Orchestra [Mercury 434 319]. No one sings but the piece is about a singer.

:46—Chicago: “Man vs. Man,” final track on Chicago III [CRD 3003]. Chicago formed in 1967 and four of the original seven members are still with the band.

:48—Phil Woods (1931- ): Third Improvisation for Saxophone Quartet, 1978, The Prism Quartet [Koch 37024]. Juilliard-trained jazz alto sax player, Woods plays the sax solos on Billy Joel’s “Just the Way You Are” and Steely Dan’s “Doctor Wu.”

:52—Michael Daugherty (1954- ): “Desi,” David Zinman, Baltimore Symphony [Argo 444 454]. Born in Iowa, professor of composition at the University of Michigan.

:57—Zez Confrey (1895-1971): “Coaxing the Piano,” 1922, Richard Dowling, piano [Klavier 77035]. Same guy who wrote “Kitten on the Keys” and “Dizzy Fingers.”

Saturday, June 27 2015

---FIRST HALF HOUR---

:04—Handel: Overture to “Music for the Royal Fireworks,” Chicago Chamber Brass [ProArte 805].

:12—Kevin Kaska (1972- ): “Pillar of Strength,” Brian O’Connor, horn; Jon Lewis, trumpet; Eric Rigler, Irish elbow pipes; Hollywood Epic Brass [DR 1012].

:18—Philip Sparke (1932- ): Dance Movements, third move., Gene Corporon, North Texas Wind Symphony ]Klavier 11084].

:23—Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (1525-1594): Ricecare del Primi Toni, Chicago Chamber Brass [ProArte 805]. 

:26—Paul Hindemith (1895-1963): Sonata for Four Horns, first move., 1952, The Pavillion Quartet [CPO 999 229]. 

---SECOND HALF HOUR---

:30—Tchaikovsky (1840-1893): Festival Coronation March, Chicago Chamber Brass [ProArte 805].

:35--Paul Hindemith (1895-1963): Morning Music for Brass, first move., Malmo Brass Ensemble [BIS 159]. 

:38--Paul Hindemith (1895-1963): Concert Music for Strings & Brass, first part, William Steinberg, Boston Symphony [DG 423 241]. 

:46—J.J. Johnson (1924-2001): “Poem for Brass,” 1957, Gunther Schiller, Brandeis University Festival of the Arts, with Joe Wilder, trumpet and Miles Davis, flugelhorn [Columbia Legacy 64929]. From the album, “The Birth of the Third Stream.” 

:57—Pete Candoli (1923-2008): “Southern Comfort,” 1955, Milt Bernhart and His Brass Ensemble, including Ray Linn, trumpet; Maynard Ferguson, euphonium; Milt Bernhart, trombone; John Graas, French horn; Paul Sarmento, tuba; Jack Marshall, guitar; Red Mitchell, bass; Irv Cottler, drums [JazzCity 2214]. 

---THIRD HALF HOUR--- 

:04—Kevin Kaska (1972- ): “Halls of Freedom,” Kevin Kaska, Hollywood Epic Brass [DR 1012].

:08—Paul Hindemith (1895-1963): Concert Music for Strings and Brass, finale, Leonard Bernstein, Israel Philharmonic [DG 429 404].

:12—Paul Hindemith (1895-1963): Morning Music for Brass, finale, Malmo Brass Ensemble [BIS 159]. 

:14—Gustav Holst (1874-1934): “Hammersmith,” Op. 52, 1930, Gene Corporon, North Texas Wind Symphony [Klavier 11070].

---FOURTH HALF HOUR---

:30—Jimmy Giuffre (1921-2008): “The Horns,” 1955, Milt Bernhart and His Brass Ensemble, including Shorty Rogers and Ray Linn, trumpets; Maynard Ferguson, euphonium; Milt Bernhart, trombone; John Graas, French horn; Ray Siegel, tuba; Jack Marshall, guitar; Red Mitchell, bass; Irv Kluger, drums [JazzCity 2214]. 

:34—Paul Hindemith (1895-1963): Sonata for Four Horns, middle move., 1952, The Pavillion Quartet [CPO 999 229].

:39—David Paitch of Toto: “Rosanna,” Maniacal 4 [Armored 86308].

:42—Walter Piston: “Tunbridge Fair,” 1950, Gene Corporon, Cincinnati Wind Symphony [Klavier 11030]. 

:47—Jimmy Giuffre (1921-2008): “Pharoah,” 1957, Gunther Schiller, Brandeis University Festival of the Arts, with Joe Wilder, trumpet and Miles Davis, flugelhorn [Columbia Legacy 64929]. From the album, “The Birth of the Third Stream.”

:52—Thelonious Monk: “Thelonious,” Bruce Fowler [A&M 6600]. 

:53—Mercer-Whiting: “Hooray for Hollywood,” 1955, Milt Bernhart and His Brass Ensemble, including Ray Linn, trumpet; Maynard Ferguson, euphonium; Milt Bernhart, trombone; John Graas, French horn; Paul Sarmento, tuba; Jack Marshall, guitar; Red Mitchell, bass; Irv Cottler, drums [JazzCity 2214]. 

:55—Gil Evans Orchestra: “Lester Leaps In,” [Giants of Jazz 53158].

Saturday, June 20 2015

---FIRST HALF HOUR---

 :04—Ernest Bloch (1880-1959): “Poems of the Sea,” first move., “Waves,” 1922, Dalia Atlas, London Symphony [Naxos 8.573241].

:09—Anton Bruckner (1824-1896): String Quintet in F major, first move., 1879, Fine Arts Quartet [Naxos 8.570788].
:24—Samuel Barber (1910-1981): Piano Sonata, Op. 26, finale, John Browning, piano [MusicMasters 67122].

---SECOND HALF HOUR---

:30—Alan Hovhaness (1911-2000): Prelude & Quadruple Fugue, 1936, Gerard Schwarz, Eastern Music Festival Orchestra [Naxos 8.559755].

:37—Arnold Schoenberg (1874-1951): Theme and Variations, Op. 43, 1943, Timothy Reynish, Royal Northern College of Music Wind Orchestra [Chandos 9805].

:50—Camille Saint-Saens (1835-1921): Barcarolle in F. Op. 108, 1897, Christine Ortiz and members of the Fine Arts Quartet [Naxos 8.572904].

---THIRD HALF HOUR---

:04—Vincent Persichetti (1915-1987): Sym. No. 6, third move., Gary Bird, IUP Brass Ensemble [Klavier 11141].

:07—Ralph Vaughan Williams  (1872-1958): Variations for Brass Band, variations 10 and 11 (finale), Donald Hunsberger, Eastman Wind Ensemble.

:11—Anton Bruckner (1824-1896): String Quartet in C minor, finale, 1862, Fine Arts Quartet [Naxos 8.570788].

:16—Aaron Copland (1900-1990): Orchestral Variations, except, 1931/1957, Michael Tilson Thomas, San Francisco Symphony [RCA Victor 68541].

:22—Luigi Dallapiccola (1904-1975): Bouree, 1956, Duccio Ceccanti, violin w/Roberto Prosseda, piano [Naxos 8.557676).

:24—Wilhelm Furtwangler (1886-1954): Sym. No. 3 in C sharp minor, finale, excerpt, Alfred Walter, Brussels Radio Symphony [Marco Polo 8.223105]. 

---FOURTH HALF HOUR---

:30--Malcolm Arnold (1921-2006): Irish Dances No. 3+4, Andrew Penny, Queensland Symphony [Naxos 553526]. 

:34--Leroy Anderson (1908-1975): Piano Concerto, finale, Jeffrey Biegel, piano w/Leonard Slatkin, BBC Concert Orchestra [Naxos 8.559313]. 

:40—Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844-1908): Piano Concerto in C sharp minor, Op. 30, 1883, finale, Malcolm Binns, pianos w/David Lloyd-Jones, English Northern Philharmonia [Hyperion 66640].

:45—Joe Zawinul: “Stories of the Danube,” finale, Casper Richter, Czech Philharmonic [Philips 454 143]. 

:47—Peter Schickele (1935- ): Quartet No. 1, “American Dreams,” last move., Audobon Quartet [RCA 7719].

:51—Paul McCartney (1942- ): Interlude from “Behold My Heart,” Gavin Greenaway, Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields [EMI 70424]. 

:55—Heitor Villa-Lobos (1887-1959): Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5, “Aria,” Steve Howe, the guitarist for Yes, with Paul Joyce, synths [Warner Bros. 653416].

Saturday, June 13 2015

---FIRST HALF HOUR---

:04—Haydn (1732-1809): String Quartet No. 31 in B minor, finale, Kodaly Quartet [Naxos 550788].
:09—Mozart (1756-1791): String Quartet No. 19 in C, “Dissonance,” first move., Emerson Quartet [DG 5523].
:20—Beethoven (1770-1827): String Quartet No. 11, “Serioso,” opening move., Emerson Quartet [DG 447 083].
:24—Mendelssohn (1809-1947): String Quartet No. 2, third move., Cleveland Quartet [Telarc 80142].
---SECOND HALF HOUR---
:30—Schubert (1797-1828): String Quartet No. 10, scherzo, Borodin String Quartet [Virgin 61265].
:32—Brahms (1833-1897): String Quartet No. 2, finale, 1873, Cleveland Quartet [Telarc 80346].
:40—Dvorak (1841-1904): String Quartet No. 12, finale, 1893, Vlach Quartet of Prague [Telarc 8.553371].
:46—Smetana (1824-1884): String Quartet No. 2, 1883, finale, Panocha Quartet [Supraphon 3450].
:49—Borodin (1833-1887): String Quartet No. 2, slow move., 1881, Borodin String Quartet [Decca 455 632].
---THIRD HALF HOUR---
:04—Michael Nyman (1944- ): String Quartet No. 2, finale, Balanescu Quartet [Argo433 093].
:08—Schoenberg (1874-1951): String Quartet No. 1, Op. 7, first move., excerpt, 1905, New Vienna String Quartet [Philips 289 464 046].
:11—Alexander Zemlinsky (1871-1942): String Quartet No. 3, Op. 19, 1924, first move., Escher Quartet [Naxos 8.572813].
:16—Janacek (1854-1928): String Quartet No. 2, “Intimate Letters,” 1928, Prazak Quartet [Harmonia Mundi 250 108].
:19—Debussy (1862-1918): Quartet, second move., 1893, Emerson String Quartet [DG 445 509].
:23—Ravel (1875-1937): Quartet, finale, 1903, Sequoia String Quartet [Delos 3004].
---FOURTH HALF HOUR---
:30—Hindemith (1895-1963): String Quartet No. 2, Op. 10, 1918, first move., Juilliard String Quartet [Wergo 6607].
:33—Prokofiev (1891-1953): String Quartet #2, finale, 1941, Chilingirian Quartet [Chandos 8929].
:36—Britten (1913-1976): String Quartet No. 2, second move., 1945, Amadeus String Quartet [London 425 715].
:40--Shostakovich (1906-1975): String Quartet No. 8, third move., 1945, Borodin String Quartet [Virgin 61630].
:45—Tchaikovsky: “Pathetique” Symphony, second move., Turtle Island String Quartet [Koch 7529].
:47—Erich Korngold (1897-1957): String Quartet No. 2, 1933, second move., Doris String Quartet [Chandos 10611].
:51—Miklos Rozsa (1907-1995): String Quartet No. 1, 1950, finale, The Flesch Quartet [ASV 1105].
:53—Miklos Rozsa (1907-1995): String Quartet No. 1, 1950, finale, Pro Arte Quartet [Laurel 842].
:54—Thelonious Monk (1917-1982): “Misterioso,” Kronos Quartet [Landmark 32011].