Arts & Culture

Arts and culture reports by Noe Tanigawa

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Now that everyone can order anything they want online, getting that special gift for those few meaningful people can actually be more fun.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports there are surprising options you’ll enjoy perusing in O‘ahu’s art galleries, including in Kailua and Hale‘iwa.

Ola Ka Ilima Artspace/Urban Works
Ola Ka Ilima Artspace/Urban Works

Abandoned buildings, urban blight, it’s common knowledge now that undesirable neighborhoods with low rental rates attract artists and creatives.   What tends to follow, are eating places, galleries, bars---and gentrification, which ends up pushing the artists out.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, an 84 unit, affordable, live/work rental space for artists is coming up in Kaka‘ako.

HCMF
HCMF

Does Honolulu really need more chamber music?  Emphatically, yes! According to one young musician who has already staged a string of successful concerts this year.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports bassist Christopher Yick wants local families to close the year on a classical note.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Filmmaker, writer, Johan Grimonprez comes at you in different ways to create an experience.  By combining found footage, familiar movie clips, newsreels, and other material, he asks questions about the effects of media on historical memory.

Flowers With Muscle

Nov 27, 2018
Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Painter Lynda Hess discovered clay recently, and while she was working, she thought about the Biblical origins of men and women.  This idea developed, becoming her new installation at the HiSAM Gallery x MORI Shop in the Hawai‘i State Art Museum.

Welcome to My Studio

Nov 16, 2018
Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

The simple sign for Kobayashi’s Art Enterprise was a familiar sight on 12th Avenue in Kaimukī for decades.  The small second floor frame shop was a hangout for one of Hawai‘i’s most important artists, Satoru Abe, who encouraged the owner, Hamilton Kobayashi to paint.  Now they’re both featured in a show at Saks 5th  Avenue in Waikīkī.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

HTY
HTY

Hawai‘i’s history with cattle started in 1793, when Captain George Vancouver gave King Kamehameha six cows and a bull.  With a kapu protecting them, wild cattle became a nuisance by 1850, so the kapu was lifted and Spanish vaqueros were brought in to manage the animals.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports a new Honolulu Theatre for Youth play explores the story of Hawaiian cowboys.

Leitis in Waiting
Leitis in Waiting

Audiences accustomed to stories about rising sea levels in the Pacific, are introduced to another sort of rising tide in the Kingdom of Tonga.  Leitis in Waiting presents the high spirits of a transsexual beauty pageant alongside religious fundamentalism that condemns both the pageant and the lifestyles it represents.

creative commons
creative commons

On Election Day 2018, Americans exercise a right of citizenship that has been evolving over the last 200 years.  When the Founding Fathers invoked ideals of liberty and justice, democracy was still under consideration as a means to get there, and, it remains a work in progress.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Museums of the Future

Nov 9, 2018
By AshLin - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19050926
By AshLin - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19050926

Museums have traditionally been repositories of knowledge, places where objects and facts would be found and preserved.  On closer examination, museums can also be seen as trophy cases for conquerors, a place where colonizers exhibit their spoils.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, a symposium in Honolulu is looking at issues and ideas for museums in the 21st century.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

The Hawai‘i Craftsmen showcase fine, handmade-in-Hawai‘i creations every year, with a special commitment to Neighbor Island artists.   Their 51st Statewide Juried Exhibition honors Honolulu sculptor and educator Fred Roster, whose personal connection between heart and hand has shaped generations of artists. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Tonight, the first Friday of November, is stacked with parties all across the state, from Hilo to Hanapēpē.  If you're in Honolulu, start with the Honolulu Printmakers' Print and Book Fair at Aloha Tower.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Deb Owen
Deb Owen

Many know the history of the music and dance form called tango—how it grew out of the working class neighborhoods of Buenos Aires, Argentina and Montevideo, Uruguay in the 1700’s.  By the early 20th century, composer Astor Piazzola created Nuevo Tango by incorporating classical and jazz elements.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports a muscular version of this celebrated music is coming to town.  With dancers.

Ohara School of Ikebana
Ohara School of Ikebana

Japanese floral design is called ikebana, and is rooted in Buddhist and Shinto traditions.  Ikebana came into its own with the development of the tea ceremony, and Japan’s most famous leaders have been accomplished practitioners of the art.  This week the Ohara School of Ikebana, Honolulu Chapter is celebrating its 60th anniversary, and Sensei Edith Tanaka agreed to give HPR listeners a peek into the art form.  Noe Tanigawa reports.

Michelle Schwengel-Regala
Michelle Schwengel-Regala

Michelle Schwengel-Regala is an artist and scientific illustrator who has worked with natural history museums in the US and Sweden.  Now a Hawai‘i resident, she spent seven weeks last year in Antarctica as a National Science Foundation Artist.  Schwengel-Regala participated in 33 scuba dives as part of her mission to translate the scientific work of the station via her art.

Bamboo Ridge
Bamboo Ridge

1978 was a significant year in Hawai‘i history—we held a statewide constitutional convention, and Eddie Aikau was lost at sea in the first sailing of the Hōkūle‘a.   That same year, Hawai‘i’s literary history reached a crossroads as well, as part of an assertion of local confidence and identity.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports a celebration is in store this Saturday.

Who Is Myles Fukunaga?

Oct 15, 2018
Orrin Nakanelua
Orrin Nakanelua

In 1929, economics and society in Hawai‘i were highly stratified.  When the ten year old son of a banker was kidnapped from Punahou School and killed, the community was horrified, and what happened to the admitted perpetrator has left questions unanswered to this day.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports a new play at Palikū Theatre sheds light on the emotions involved.

HOT
HOT

Building on a history that dates back to the monarchy, today, opera is finding a new footing in Honolulu.  Hawai‘i Opera Theatre’s longtime Artistic Director retired last year and HOT’s General Director left suddenly in April.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, change is in the air.

Anna Badkhen
Anna Badkhen

Writer, Anna Badkhen, covered wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Somalia, traveling and writing widely before choosing to focus simply on the lives of rug makers through the seasons in a village in northern Afghanistan .  Her books document travel and eating in remote areas, the migration of endangered nomads in Mali, and most recently, fishermen losing their ancient livelihoods in Senegal.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, Badkhen will be speaking at UH Mānoa this Friday (10/12/2018) on “The Contemporary Writer and Social Responsibility.”

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Artist Tommy Hite is perhaps best known for his realistic paintings of dumpsters around Honolulu.  The ubiquitous bins are often in scenic locations, and who can forget Hite’s dumpster at the end of the rainbow?  His new show features historic European portraits, localized, for example, someone’s regal hat becomes a Zippy’s chili container.  HPR's Noe Tanigawa reports, it’s all in the details.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Interesting cups, plates, bowl and glasses can make eating much more pleasurable.  An exhibition at the Louis Pohl Gallery in Chinatown offers art for everyday appreciation: paintings by Lauren Okano, glass by Mark Mitsuda, and ceramics by Erin Yuasa.

 Honolulu City and County
Honolulu City and County

Planning for Honolulu’s civic center, the Neal Blaisdell complex, started before Hawai‘i was even a state.  The concert hall, arena and exhibition hall were completed in 1964, when O‘ahu’s population was less than half what it is today.  Now, a major redesign is aiming for a revitalized community space that attracts global artists in their prime.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Sculptor Lonny Tomono is returning from an artist's residency in New York City, just in time to celebrate a show he’s got at Ars Café on Diamond Head.  The classic, but sensuous, wood sculptures were all made in Tomono's studio outside Hilo.

creative commons
creative commons

Maui seems to be getting a handle on its homeless population, but finding affordable rentals is still the main problem, whether you’re on the street yet or not.  A recent study concluded Maui will need 14,000 more housing units by 2025, and while that target may be hard to hit, new ideas in neighborhood living are starting to take root on the Valley Isle.

creative commons
creative commons

The latest word is, homeless numbers on Maui may be going down after recent storms, as several families and individuals have decided to seek permanent housing.  At last count, there were about 900 people homeless on the Valley Isle.  HPR’s series about housing on Maui continues with a look at what is working to shelter the homeless, and what is ahead to create housing they can afford.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Rain, wind and flooding on Maui have put extra pressure on the homeless.  Authorities say, some take advantage of shelters, but they aren’t sure what the majority do.  Ad hoc living spaces on the island run the gamut from a tarp to tents to shacks with electricity and wifi.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa took a tour recently with a Maui social worker. 

creative commons
creative commons

Family life has changed on Maui, according to Maude Cumming, Executive Director of the Family Life Center, Maui’s primary homeless outreach agency.  Changing families, population growth, and high flying real estate are all factors in the spread of homelessness, but Family Life Center is finding ways to rebuild community.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

In this segment, it’s a pleasure to take you to an amazing homeless shelter and affordable housing complex on Maui. 

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

The recent Lahaina brush fire burned down thirteen houses and threatened residents all the way to Kā‘anapali.  The fire advanced to the perimeter of Ka Hale A Ke Ola, a homeless housing center, whose 300 residents felt the heat on their backs as they evacuated.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports that center, which emerged without a scorch, is part of Maui’s housing safety net.

A Bon Dance Primer

Aug 29, 2018
Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

According to Buddhist tradition, summer is the time of year that spirits of the dead return to visit with their loved ones on earth.  Far from being a scary thing, the idea is a village-wide celebration to welcome them back. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa and Catherine Cruz discussed Hawai‘i style bon dance on The Conversation.

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